Beignet Cafe offers sweet indulgences

A platter of beignets and a cup of fresh coffee at the Beignet Cafe.

A platter of beignets and a cup of fresh coffee at the Beignet Cafe.

Beignet Cafe opened in April just off South Main and has already found a loyal following among the residents in the area. It might be the coffee selection or the fresh-anytime beignets that draws them.

Either is a good enough reason, but what will get me there again and again will be the mac and cheese balls.

 Beignet Cafe's menu includes the signature beignets, sandwiches, salads and a coffee bar.  Among the treats is a salmon BLT made with roasted salmon, Swiss cheese, herb mayonnaise, bacon, lettuce and cherry tomatoes on multigrain bread.

Photo by Photos by Stan Carroll/The Commercial Appeal

Beignet Cafe's menu includes the signature beignets, sandwiches, salads and a coffee bar. Among the treats is a salmon BLT made with roasted salmon, Swiss cheese, herb mayonnaise, bacon, lettuce and cherry tomatoes on multigrain bread.

The restaurant entrance leads to multiple seating and a raised porch for dining.  Beignet Cafe recently opened at 124 G.E. Patterson Downtown near South Main and has already earned a following for the specialty sandwiches, beignets and more.

The restaurant entrance leads to multiple seating and a raised porch for dining. Beignet Cafe recently opened at 124 G.E. Patterson Downtown near South Main and has already earned a following for the specialty sandwiches, beignets and more.

A platter of beignets and a cup of fresh coffee at the Beignet Cafe.

A platter of beignets and a cup of fresh coffee at the Beignet Cafe.

Owner and beignet master Charles Duke rolls out a fresh batch of beignets.  Each order is prepared fresh.

Owner and beignet master Charles Duke rolls out a fresh batch of beignets. Each order is prepared fresh.

Yeah, that's right. And they're deep fried.

Restaurant owner Charles Duke makes old-fashioned, creamy macaroni and cheese with three cheeses, doesn't skimp on the butter or cream, and packs it in a pan and refrigerates it until it's cold enough to form into a ball. The balls are dipped in egg and bread crumbs, then deep fried until golden brown.

You know that great mac and cheese that has a nice crunchy layer of breadcrumbs on the top? Well, this is it times 10. With every forkful you get a crisp layer of breading and a creamy bite of rich mac and cheese,

which is soft and gooey after frying.

OK, of course, I'm not going to eat it every day.

But I could.

I can feel better about myself if I indulge in the shrimp po' boy instead. Eschewing the fried standard, this po' boy is made of sauteed plump shrimp on French bread, topped with lettuce and tomato and served with a spicy herb mayonnaise. Go easy on the mayo and ask the kitchen to go light on the fat when sauteing the shrimp and presto, you're eating right.

I also like the veggie sandwich, though I'd make a modification. The sandwich, served on hearty multigrain bread, contains avocado, sun-dried tomatoes, cucumber, mixed greens and cheddar cheese. With these veggies, I'd prefer the fresh flavor of a ripe tomato instead of the deeper notes of the sun-dried ones. Next time, I'll ask for the substitution. Still, the sandwich is tasty, filling and a good choice for vegetarians looking to stay away from deep-fried macaroni.

Landlord Norma Crow, from Nashville, bought the building and renovated it because she wanted to move to Memphis. She knew she wanted a restaurant, but as a tenant -- she didn't want to run one.

"This was my vision and I was fortunate enough to find someone to handle the business part," she said of Duke.

She said the building was built in 1949 as Tri-State Bank, and was housing the Tri-State Defender newspaper when she purchased it (the paper was in the process of moving to a new location on Beale).

The interior was restored to its timbers (cotton was the insulation in the attic) and is decorated in a warm and welcome manner that includes local art and soft seating areas that invite folks to linger, as well as tables for meals.

To the beignets, fried dough with powdered sugar: What's not to like? Most cultures have a fried sweet dough, and we're fortunate that our proximity to New Orleans gives us a decent shot at beignets now and again. These are puffy and satisfying, served with a more generous dousing of sugar than the stylized photo shows.

The cafe serves a full breakfast, available anytime, and features a jazz brunch on Sundays with New Orleans favorites such as shrimp and grits. Other New Orleans classics -- gumbo, jambalaya and the like -- are frequent specials.

Green salads and tuna, chicken and pasta salads are also available. The chicken salad is an excellent simple version, made with chunks of chicken, celery, mayonnaise and seasoning.

Salmon lovers will definitely want the salmon BLT. A generous roasted fillet is topped with Swiss cheese, a nice peppered bacon, lettuce and tomatoes and finished with the spicy herb mayo.

Beignet Cafe is a comfortable and creative new restaurant well worth a try. A liquor license is pending and should be approved within a few weeks, at which time wine, beer and specialty daiquiris will be available along with other mixed drinks.

Beignet Cafe

Address: 124 G. E. Patterson Ave.

Telephone: (901) 527-1551

Hours: Tuesday through Thursday, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunday brunch, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Closed Monday

Price: $

Handicapped access: Yes

Alcoholic beverages: License expected within a few weeks; no alcohol at this time but you can bring in your own wine for a $2 corkage fee.

Don't miss: The beignets, the mac and cheese balls, the shrimp po' boy.

-- Jennifer Biggs: 529-5223

© 2009 Go Memphis. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments » 1

shanea1976#330169 writes:

Great place.

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