Movie Capsules: Now showing

James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones

Capsule descriptions by The Commercial Appeal movie writer John Beifuss.

OPENING TODAY

Blood Done Sign My Name (PG-13, 128 min.) A drama inspired by a 1970s murder and civil rights trial in North Carolina.

Majestic.

Shutter Island (R, 138 min.) Leonardo DiCaprio investigates an insane asylum, for director Martin Scorsese. See John Beifuss' review at GoMemphis.com.

Forest Hill 8, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

SPECIAL MOVIES

The Alps: The latest IMAX film follows climber John Harlin III in his attempt to climb the Eiger in the Swiss Alps. Runs through Nov. 12. Tickets $8, $7.25 senior citizens, $6.25 children ages 3-12; children under 3 are free. Call for show times. alpsfilm.com

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 320-6362 for tickets and reservations.

James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones

Black Indians: An American Story (Not rated, 60 min.) James Earl Jones -- himself a "black Indian" -- narrates this 2001 documentary examining issues of racial identity among those with both Native American and African-American ancestry.

2 p.m. Sunday, the C.H. Nash Museum Theater at Chucalissa. Admission: free. Visit memphis.edu/chucalissa.

The Celebration (R, 105 min.) The "Reel to Real" series continues with guest curator and evening's host Craig Brewer, who says this intense 1998 Danish ensemble drama about a particularly fraught family birthday gathering showed him how to pursue purposeful, economical filmmaking. The feature will be preceded by a half hour of rare footage from Brewer's archives, including clips from his never completed early feature, "Melody's Surviving."

7 p.m. Thursday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: $8, or $6 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org, or call 544-6208.

Celine Dion: Through the Eyes of the World (Not rated, 117 min.) A behind-the-scenes documentary and concert film about the Canadian diva.

2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday, Paradiso. Tickets: $15 each. Visit malco.com.

The Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2010 -- Animation (Not rated, 95 min.) See story on Page 15.

2 p.m. Saturday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: $8, or $5 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org or onlocationmemphis.org.

The Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2010 -- Live Action (Not rated, 92 min.) See story on Page 15.

4 p.m. Sunday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: $8, or $5 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org or onlocationmemphis.org.

Pink Palace IMAX Film Festival: Saturdays & Sundays in February. See all your favorite IMAX films: "Dolphins" (1 p.m.); "The Alps" (2 p.m.); "Under the Sea" (3 p.m.); "Journey Into Amazing Caves" (4 p.m.); and "Mystery of the Nile" (11 a.m. Saturdays only). Tickets: $8, $7.25 senior citizens, $6.25 for children ages 3-12; children under 3 are free. memphismuseums.org

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 320-6362 for tickets and reservations.

Under the Sea: This new IMAX adventure transports you to some of the most exotic and isolated undersea locations on Earth. Runs through March 5, 2010. Tickets: $8, $7.25 senior citizens, $6.25 children ages 3-12; children under 3 are free. Call for show times.

Crew Training International IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 320-6362 for reservations and tickets.

NOW SHOWING

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel (PG, 89 min.) Richard Widmark is dead, but his spirit improbably lives on in Alvin, Simon and Theodore, who send an old lady in a wheelchair down a steep flight of stairs, as if in homage to the film-noir classic "Kiss of Death." The harmonizing rodents also smash their human sponsor, Dave Seville (Jason Lee), with a piece of stage scenery, putting him in traction for most of the film; maybe what this "squeakquel" needs isn't a reviewer but an exterminator. Zachary Levi is unfunny as Dave's slacker cousin, who sends the Chipmunks off to school, where their computer-generated cuteness and ability to utter tired urban slang in a helium voice ("Holla! The Cheez Balls are in the hizouse!" chirps Alvin) make them babe magnets, at least until the arrival of the even cuter Chipettes, a female trio of 'munks who wow the crowd with a finger-snapping, neck-bobbing cover of Beyoncé's "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)."

Stage Cinema, Majestic, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Armored (PG-13, 88 min.) Matt Dillon plans a heist.

Bartlett 10, Majestic.

Avatar (PG-13, 162 min.) Twelve years after "Titanic," writer-director James Cameron returns with the most expensive movie ever (reported budget: $240 million), a science-fiction eco-spectacle that could be described as "Dances with Wolves" or "The New World" in outer space, as a paraplegic Marine (Sam Worthington) on the distant planet Pandora in the year 2154 rejects his imperialistic, exploitative and genocidal mission after spending time in a genetically manufactured "avatar" body among the indigenous Na'vi: blue-skinned humanoids who hunt with bows and arrows, ride pterodactyl-like "banshees" and live in harmony with the planet's bioluminescent flora and fauna (including several amazing monsters). A paean to nature created almost entirely through state-of-the-art digital technology (most of the actors are themselves represented onscreen by "avatars," including Zoë Saldaña, transformed through the "motion capture" process into a Na'vi princess), "Avatar" works as both a socially conscious Western update and a true SF film, revealing the influences of such fine genre writers as Philip José Farmer, Larry Niven and especially Edgar Rice Burroughs, whose "John Carter of Mars" novels inspired the story's premise and the design of the multilimbed creatures.

Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D).

The Blind Side (PG-13, 126 min.) Sarah Palin isn't the only gun-toting, ex-cheerleader, conservative Christian sports mom back in the news. We've also got Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy, the no-nonsense, git-'r-done Memphian whose rescue of inner-city gentle giant and future football star Michael Oher provides the real-life inspiration for director John Lee Hancock's tearless tearjerker (steel magnolia Leigh Anne leaves the room whenever she's about to cry). Played with quiet, hulking dignity by Quinton Aaron, Michael is presented as a passive, almost infantile figure(his only apparent friend is his adoptive brother, the Tuohys' wisecracking young son), as well as an attractive ideal for white audiences: a kid from the 'hood who is not only not a threat to the suburbs but actually a protector of white culture, roused to anger only in defense of Leigh Anne's honor while his real mother (native Memphian Adriane Lenox) languishes in Hurt Village with her crack pipe. On the positive tip, the movie -- which functions primarily as a star vehicle for Bullock -- presents a welcome sympathetic portrait of the type of "traditional values" family rarely seen onscreen. With Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne's husband, Grizzlies broadcast analyst Sean Tuohy, and Atlanta as Memphis.

Stage Cinema, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Paradiso, CinePlanet 16.

The Book of Eli (R, 118 min.) With a knife that would scare a samurai and the world's last remaining Bible as his prized possessions, butt-kicking prophet of God Denzel Washington wanders an ashy wasteland in this Mad-to-the-Max post-apocalyptic Western from director brothers Albert and Allen Hughes ("Menace II Society"). Evil Gary Oldman covets the Good Book, because he believes its words have the power to convince others to do his bidding; the film seems to suggest the Bible really is the key to salvation but leaves enough wiggle room for those who prefer a secular interpretation. Bad casting: Mila Kunis as a post-disaster barmaid who looks like she just stepped off a fashion runway. Moment of grace: Denzel listens to a Memphis soul classic, Al Green's Willie Mitchell-produced cover of "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart," on his iPod. A truly daffy movie.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Brothers (R, 110 min.)

Bartlett 10.

Couples Retreat (PG-13, 114 min.)

Bartlett 10.

Crazy Heart (R, 112 min.) As "Bad Blake," a broke, alcoholic country singer-songwriter nicknamed "the Wrangler of Love," Best Actor nominee Jeff Bridges brings all his four decades of deceptively casual charm and unpretentious smarts to what is proving to be his signature role. Adapted by debuting director Scott Cooper from a novel by Thomas Cobb, the film is something of an anomaly on the current movie landscape: a relaxed, 1970s-style character study more interested in observing behavior than in surprising viewers with the "twists" of a story, as Blake seeks romantic refuge with a single mother (Maggie Gyllenhaal) who knows better. The film's original songs, performed by Bridges, mostly were written by T Bone Burnett and the late Stephen Bruton, but viewers may prefer Blake's explanation for the compositions. When asked, "Where did all those songs come from?" he responds: "Life, unfortunately."

Ridgeway Four, Cordova Cinema.

Dear John (PG-13, 108 min.) A soldier (Channing Tatum) falls for a college student (Amanda Seyfried) in this adaptation of Nicholas Sparks' best-seller.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Did You Hear About the Morgans? (PG-13, 104 min.)

Bartlett 10.

Edge of Darkness (R, 117 min.) As a Boston cop whose prodigal daughter is murdered on his doorstep, Mel Gibson makes a tailor-made return to tough-guy stardom in this potent murder mystery/conspiracy thriller with an aura of old-school gloom. Directed by Martin Campbell ("Casino Royale") from a 1985 BBC miniseries, the real antecedent here is Fritz Lang's 1953 masterpiece "The Big Heat," in which humble police detective Glenn Ford is galvanized by the murder of his wife into becoming the rogue disrupter of a vast conspiracy of corrupt wealth and politics. As both TEA partiers and Bolsheviks would tell you, narratives about angry, rough-edged men toppling the palaces of power never lose their allure. The fine supporting cast includes Ray Winstone as an erudite if Cockney-accented assassin/fixer who delivers the story's noir motto: "We all know what the facts are. We live a while, and then we die sooner than we'd planned."

Forest Hill 8, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

An Education (PG-13, 95 min.) Set in 1969 London, this impeccably mounted and acted BBC Films production from director Lone Scherfig is the type of sturdy character study and "movie of quality" that habituées of the modern "art" house expect but too infrequently experience. Adapted by popular British novelist Nick Hornby from Lynn Barber's coming-of-age memoir, the movie chronicles the initially flattering and exciting but inevitably troubling courtship/seduction of Jenny (Carey Mulligan), a pretty and extremely bright but naive 16-year-old virgin, by David (Peter Sarsgaard), a seemingly sophisticated charmer almost twice her age who seems to offer a shortcut to the life of existential novels, foreign films and jazz nightclubs that Jenny longs to inhabit. The stay-in-school message is surprisingly conventional, but its delivery is entirely pleasurable.

Ridgeway Four.

Fantastic Mr. Fox (PG, 87 min.)

Bartlett 10.

From Paris With Love (R, 95 min.) Bald secret agent John Travolta is a "trigger-happy, wisecracking, loose cannon" in this action movie from director Pierre Morel ("Taken").

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Hurt Locker (R, 131 min.) Wired like a ticking time bomb, director Kathryn Bigelow's stunner focuses on three soldiers in an Army bomb-disposal unit as they try to survive the final 38 days of their field rotation in the forbidding, alien environment of Iraq. A thoughtful nail-biter, the film inspires us to appreciate the precariousness and relative brevity of existence, as the soldiers' encounters with IEDs and wired-to-explode Iraqis become extreme representations of the tug between life and death that challenges each of us every day, however mundane and seemingly safe our environment. The movie is not without political content (a soldier's apology to a doomed Iraqi seems addressed to the entire country), but mostly it expresses genuine admiration for the professionalism -- the heroism, if you will -- of the soldiers. "Good job," one says to another, after a particularly intense situation has been resolved; as in a Howard Hawks movie, that is the highest praise possible.

Bartlett 10.

It's Complicated (R, 118 min.)

Stage Cinema.

Leap Year (PG, 100 min.) Amy Adams and Matthew Goode find romance in Ireland.

Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Legion (R, 101 min.) Movies don't get much more wick wick wack than this amusingly God-awful -- and yes, that's God with a capital 'G' -- horror-action spectacle that alternates between outrageous camp and sobersided sanctimony as it slouches toward immortality via some future incarnation of "Mystery Science Theater 3000." The apparent bad guy is God Almighty Himself, who has "unleashed" the "dogs of heaven" -- his angel army -- to destroy humankind because he's "lost faith" in his creations. Instead of simply smiting us, however, the angels for some reason prefer to possess humans, "Exorcist"-style, turning them into Romeroesque zombies who mass on Dennis Quaid's isolated desert diner to destroy a pregnant woman whose unborn baby is the "hope" of humankind. Paul Bettany is the rogue angel Michael, who thinks humanity is worth saving. The daffy highlight: A sweet little old lady transforms into a shark-toothed, wall-crawling spider-granny.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Lovely Bones (PG-13, 135 min.) Peter Jackson's adaptation of Alice Sebold's best-seller is set in suburban Pennsylvania, but the director of the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy and the "King Kong" remake seems to have been reluctant to leave Middle-earth and Skull Island behind. Throughout the film, he guides us through tediously inventive computer-generated heavenly landscapes that are part nightmare, part "Teletubbies," when what we really want to see is more of the creepily mundane interior of a serial killer's orderly home. Saorsie Ronan is wonderful as the 14-year-old murder victim who narrates the film and watches the effect of her death on her friends, parents (Mark Wahlberg and Rachel Weisz) and murderer (scene-stealing Stanley Tucci), but the distorting wide-angle lenses and broad staging that Jackson favors expose the sappiness of the story's comforting Family Circus notion that departed loved ones continue to hover around us and cheer us on.

Stage Cinema, Majestic, Hollywood 20 Cinema.

My Name Is Khan (Not rated, 161 min.) Another Bollywood musical comes to the Hollywood 20; this one is about a Muslim from India who faces difficulties after 9/11.

Hollywood 20 Cinema.

Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief (PG, 120 min.) Director Chris Columbus first brought Harry Potter to the screen; here, he moves on to the Young Adult novels of Rick Riordan, which tell the similar story of teenaged Percy Jackson (Logan Lerman), who discovers he's the son of the Greek god Poseidon (Kevin McKidd) and the heir to magical powers; he enrolls in a sort of Hellenic Hogswart, and soon learns that centaurs, minotaurs and Mt. Olympus aren't myths. Like Columbus' cheery Potter films (which were inferior to the darker sequels made by other directors), this is a fun, effects-filled, escapist adventure, with several clever notions: Medusa (Uma Thurman) sells garden statuary as a cover, and the Parthenon in Nashville is home to a hydra. With Sean Bean as Zeus, Steve Coogan as Hades and Brandon T. Jackson as Percy's best friend, a satyr.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Planet 51 (PG, 97 min.)

Bartlett 10.

Preacher's Kid (PG-13, 101 min.) LeToya Luckett is the "prodigal daughter" who returns home after running away to join the cast of a touring gospel stage play in this Christian-themed film.

Majestic.

The Princess and the Frog (G, 97 min.)

Bartlett 10.

Sherlock Holmes (PG-13, 130 min.) As reimagined for the 21st-century multiplex and enacted with a semi-maniacal gleam in his eye by a mischievous Robert Downey Jr., this latest Holmes -- never seen with a deerstalker and magnifying glass but frequently stripped down to suspenders and pantaloons, the better for bare-knuckle brawling -- may displease Arthur Conan Doyle purists but should find favor with audiences eager for a fun, witty action movie (call it "Indiana Holmes"). Adopting a somewhat toned-down version of the hyperkinetic style he brings to his British gangster yarns, director Guy Ritchie finds ways to justify Holmes' almost Supersherlock fighting prowess (the detective uses his big brain to deduce an opponent's weaknesses); also throwing punches in the battle against a secret society that wants to "remake the world" is Jude Law as an efficient Dr. Watson who bears little resemblance to the portly fuddy-duddy played by Nigel Bruce in the famous Basil Rathbone films.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

A Single Man (R, 101 min.) With its artfully desaturated color scheme and its impeccably costumed actors, the directorial debut of fashion designer Tom Ford resembles a tasteful magazine layout with a 1962 Southern California theme. But the stiffness and joylessness (who ever imagined watching Julianne Moore twist to "Green Onions" could be so grim?) is appropriate. Adapted from a 1964 novel by Christopher Isherwood, this is the story of the possible last day in the life of a middle-aged college professor (a superb Colin Firth) who is not just in mourning for the death of his longtime lover (Matthew Goode) but is preparing his suicide. Unwanted and unacknowledged by his lover's family, the professor is unable to mourn publicly; the film is a sensitive portrait of a man who feels wiped away by a society that forces his true self to be, in his word, "invisible."

Ridgeway Four.

The Spy Next Door (PG, 92 min.) A CIA agent faces his toughest assignment: Babysitting three kids! In other words: "The Pacifier," but with Jackie Chan.

Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, CinePlanet 16.

Tooth Fairy (PG, 102 min.) Hockey player Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson must atone for a bad deed by spending one week as the magical tooth fairy.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

2012 (PG-13, 158 min.)

Bartlett 10.

The Twilight Saga: New Moon (PG-13, 130 min.) Kristen Stewart's Bella Swan (her name is still the best thing in the series) is torn between her love for self-exiled pretty-boy bloodsucker Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and her attraction to Native American werehunk Jacob Black (Taylor Lautner) in this wheel-spinning sequel, in which the virginal Bella's tedious moping (she longs to be "bitten," get it?) takes center stage, until a poorly delivered telephone message (what a lame dramatic device!) implausibly sends everyone to Italy to confront the vampire lawmaking coven, the Vulturi. The most amusing moments are those in which director Chris Weitz indulges the desires of author Stephenie Meyer's primarily female fan base, as when he has Jacob gratuitously remove his shirt to mop Bella's blood or depicts Edward crossing a street in smoldering slow-motion.

Bartlett 10, Majestic.

Up in the Air (R, 109 min.) Adapted from a novel by Walter Kirn, the third feature from director Jason Reitman ("Thank You for Smoking," "Juno") is a solid adult comedy-drama, with lead characters sturdy enough to have been played by Cary Grant and Lauren Bacall in another era, and actors confident and talented enough not to be humiliated by the comparison. George Clooney stars as a proudly independent corporate "downsizer," who claims to love the relationship-free life of airports and hotels mandated by his career; he's matched by Vera Farmiga -- acting without a shred of insecurity or audience-pandering cuteness -- as a sympathetic and sexy frequent flier, and Anna Kendrick as the upstart colleague who wants to revolutionize the "firing" industry and make Clooney's job obsolete. The film's tour of recession America, as seen through the eyes of a man who profits from the devastation, has earned it much praise; but the topical themes and character insights become redundant during a belabored final act.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Collierville Towne 16.

Valentine's Day (PG-13, 125 min.) When "sports journalist" Jamie Foxx asserts that Valentine's Day gives him acid reflux, you'll wonder if he's talking about the holiday or this sub-sitcom hodgepodge of inteconnected romantic mini-dramas, primed to make susceptible female viewers sigh (isn't Ashton Kutcher puppy-dog cute?) and hiss (Patrick Dempsey is cheating on his wife!) on cue. Incapable of staging even a single interesting shot, nice guy-but-hopeless hack director Garry Marshall has assembled a glittery all-ages ensemble that includes Julia Roberts, Jessica Biel, Shirley MacLaine, Bradley Cooper, two Taylors (Lautner and Swift), Emma Roberts (a virgin who decides not to go all the way before college) and Kathy Bates and Queen Latifah. (The latter two are the only actors unrewarded with a romantic subplot -- what, plus-sized ladies don't deserve no love??) For the most part, the stars know they're in a piece of junk. You can see it in their eyes, except for Jessica Alba's -- you can't see anything in there.

Ridgeway Four, Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

When in Rome (PG-13, 91 min.) A better fit for one of the Eternal City's apocryphal vomitoriums than for a movie theater, this embarrassment casts Kristen Bell as a stubbornly single Guggenheim curator (!) pursued by a series of wacky suitors (illusionist Jon Heder, sausage mogul Danny DeVito, etc.) after she liberates their wishing coins from a magic fountain of love in Rome. Bell's conundrum: Is hunky sportswriter Josh Duhamel sincere in his sudden courtship, or also bewitched? Charmless and unbelievable, from a director who specializes in the stupefying, Mark Steven Johnson ("Daredevil," "Ghost Rider").

Stage Cinema, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

The Wolfman (R, 91 min.) Arriving late to a troubled production, journeyman director Joe Johnston ("The Rocketeer," "Jurassic Park III") has crafted a generally effective if inconsequential monster movie, highlighted by Rick Baker's beautifully rendered makeup effects and designs. Channeling brooding Oliver Reed in "The Curse of the Werewolf" as well as Lon Chaney Jr. in the 1940s Universal "Wolf Man" series, genuine wolf-fan Benicio Del Toro (he's one of the film's producers) stars as Shakespearean actor Lawrence Talbot (to be or not to be, indeed), tortured by Freudian as well as lycanthropic impulses: His father (Anthony Hopkins) is unsympathetic, and his love interest (Emily Blunt) resembles his dead mother. No wonder a key transformation takes place in an asylum, where he gleefully shreds apart a know-it-all doctor with a Viennese accent.

Forest Hill 8, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

The Young Victoria (PG, 100 min.) Charming Emily Blunt is the teen Queen Victoria.

Forest Hill 8, Studio on the Square, Hollywood 20 Cinema.

© 2010 Go Memphis. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Want to participate in the conversation? Become a subscriber today. Subscribers can read and comment on any story, anytime. Non-subscribers will only be able to view comments on select stories.