Movie Capsules: Now showing

Bradley Cooper (from left), Zach Galifianakis and Ed Helms are shown in a scene from 'The Hangover Part II.'

Photo by Warner Bros. Pictures, Melinda Sue Gordon

Bradley Cooper (from left), Zach Galifianakis and Ed Helms are shown in a scene from "The Hangover Part II."

Capsule descriptions by The Commercial Appeal movie writer John Beifuss.

OPENING FRIDAY

Buck (PG, 88 min.) See review.

Ridgeway Four.

Larry Crowne (PG-13, 99 min.) See review.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Paradiso, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Monte Carlo (PG, 109 min.) Selena Gomez, Leighton Meester and Katie Cassidy have a dream vacation.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

The Music Never Stopped (PG, 105 min.) A Grateful Dead fan (Lou Taylor Pucci) with a brain tumor struggles to bond with his father (J.K. Simmons).

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Turtle: The Incredible Journey (G, 81 min.) A documentary chronicle about the Florida-to-Africa roundtrip voyage of the loggerhead turtle.

Collierville Towne 16, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

SPECIAL MOVIES

The Firm (R, 154 min.) A 1993 made-in-Memphis John Grisham adaptation, with Tom Cruise and Gene Hackman.

7:15 p.m. Thursday, the Orpheum, 203 S. Main. Admission: $7 per adult, $5 per senior or child (12 and under). Visit orpheum-memphis.org or call 525-3000.

Hori Smoku Sailor Jerry: The Life of Norman K. Colins (Not rated, 77 min.) A documentary about the rough-and-ready man who more or less invented the art of the modern tattoo. A 6 p.m. cocktail party with live music by the River City Tanlines precedes the film.

7 p.m. Thursday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: free. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

Hustle & Flow (R, 116 min.) Writer-director Craig Brewer will introduce this screening of his 2005 Oscar-winner. Joseph Barrios and the Ne'er-Do-Wells will perform in the lobby prior to the movie.

7:15 p.m. Friday, the Orpheum, 203 S. Main. Admission: $7 per adult, $5 per senior or child (12 and under). Visit orpheum-memphis.org or call 525-3000.

Hubble: Narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio, this new IMAX film explores the legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope and its impact on our understanding of the universe. Runs through Nov. 11. Tickets $8.25, $7.50 senior citizens, $6.50 children ages 3-12; children under 3 free.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call (901) 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

The Last Waltz (PG, 117 min.) See story on Page 4.

Dusk Friday, Levitt Park Shell. Visit indiememphis.com.

Legends of Flight: Experience aerial innovation at the dawn of a new era in flight transportation; an insider's view of how a modern aircraft is built. Through Nov. 11. Tickets $8.25, $7.50 senior citizens, $6.50 children ages 3-12; children under 3 free.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call (901) 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

Street Days (Not rated, 89 min.) The problems of life in post-Soviet Georgia are explored in this 2010 "Global Lens" drama about a middle-aged unemployed heroin addict in Tbilisi.

2 p.m. Friday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: $7 or $5 for museum members; free for Indie Memphis members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

The Ultimate Wave Tahiti: Viewers will learn how waves influence and shape our planet while they ride alongside champion surfer Kelly Slater as he challenges Tahiti's toughest wave. Runs through March 2, 2012. Tickets $8.25, $7.50 senior citizens, $6.50 children ages 3-12; children under 3 free.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call (901) 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

NOW SHOWING

Bad Teacher (R, 89 min.) Would "Bridesmaids" have worked if audiences were asked to sympathize with a meaner version of Rose Byrne and root against Kristen Wiig? In essence, that's the premise of this miscalculated, loosely plotted, needlessly crude and occasionally funny film, with Cameron Diaz perfectly cast as a sexy, pot-smoking, booze-swilling, gold-digging and disinterested-in-education 7th-grade teacher whose rival at her new school is the enthusiastically nerdy and dedicated Amy Squirrel, beautifully played by Lucy Punch (the cockney sexpot of Woody Allen's "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger"). Self-centered characters can be amusing, but Diaz's teacher is so shallow (she's saving money for breast implants) she's just not likable, unlike her gym-teacher suitor (Jason Segel) and dolphin-obsessed principal (John Michael Higgins). Playing against his pop-idol image in glasses and a bowtie, Justin Timberlake adds little to the film. Directed by Jake Kasdan, who's done much better ("Dewey Cox," "The Zero Effect"), as have scripters Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg ("The Office," "Year One").

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Bridesmaids (R, 125 min.) Advertised as a sort of female response to "The Hangover," this frequently hilarious film is as much a coronation as a wedding celebration, with current "Saturday Night Live" MVP Kristen Wiig emerging as a successor to Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett as the new queen of knockabout comedy. Directed by Paul Feig ("Freaks and Geeks") and produced by Judd Apatow (who apparently is responsible for a soon-to-be-infamous food-poisoning sequence and other male-friendly gross-out moments), the movie -- despite its wonderful ensemble cast and generous plural title -- is Wiig's show all the way, with the actress cast as an unlucky-in-love Milwaukee failure facing her role as maid of honor in the marriage of her lifelong best friend (Maya Rudolph) with a mix of pride, dread and jealousy; the latter emotion is compounded when she meets a bridesmaid (Rose Byrne) who seems to be using her beauty, poise and prestige Chicago address to insinuate herself into the bride's life as a new best friend. This rivalry is wonderfully played and convincingly written by Wiig and her longtime comedy collaborator, Annie Mumolo.

Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

Cars 2 (G, 112 min.) Directed by Pixar/Disney Animation head John Lasseter, this inevitable sequel to 2006's "Cars" is the first Pixar film that seems unnecessary -- more marketplace contrivance than passion project. It's enjoyable on its own meager terms, but it puts the brakes on Pixar's 15-year record of innovation and excellence. Set once again in a weird world that suggests (to me, at least) that all flesh-and-blood life was extinguished in some sort of rise-of-the-machines apocalypse ("Cars" is like the "Planet of the Apes" of cartoon car movies), this globetrotting James Bond spoof demotes race star Lightning McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson) to supporting-player status to showcase the snaggle-toothed hayseed humor of the rusty but lovable tow truck, Mater (Larry the Cable Guy), who is mistaken for a genius spy by secret agent Finn McMissile (Michael Caine) and his data analyst, Holley Shiftwell (Emily Mortimer), whose vaguely risqué name is a funny car-centric variant on such famous Bond girl monikers as Holly Goodhead. The digital animation is as brilliant as expected, but the film fumbles its "green" message, and it's suprisingly violent: Villains command "Kill him!" -- twice. Is this a phrase parents want their children repeating?

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Raleigh Springs Cinema, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Cave of Forgotten Dreams (Not rated, 90 min.) The latest fascinating, frustrating and utterly distinctive documentary from German filmmaker Werner Herzog begins among the prehistoric paintings of the Chauvet Cave of Southern France but somehow ends with a contemplation of modern man's relationship to an imagined future world of radioactive mutant albino crocodiles. "Are we today, possibly, the crocodiles who look back into an abyss of time?" Herzog asks with the deliberate deadpan delivery, heavy German accent and even heavier Germanic existentialism that have made him one of the most welcome, preposterous and even funny figures in current cinema. As Stephen Colbert responded, when Herzog brought up the albino crocodiles during a recent interview on "The Colbert Report": "I want to party with you, cowboy." A longtime spelunker of the human mind and soul as well as some of the more inaccessible recesses of the planet, Herzog here investigates the 1,300-foot-long Chauvet Cave, "a perfect time capsule" of sparkling calcification that is home to what the filmmaker calls "one of the greatest discoveries in the history of human culture": Beautifully preserved paintings of lions, bears, bison, mammoths, aurochs, horses and wooly rhinoceroses that date back 32,000 years, making them twice as old as any previously discovered cave paintings. "It is as if the modern soul had awakened here," Herzog declares, with the extremist enthusiasm that makes him almost cuddly in his pretentiousness, like an obsessed hobbyist uncle.

Ridgeway Four (in 3-D).

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules (PG, 100 min.) This second film inspired by the popular Jeff Kinney kids' book series emphasizes the rivalry and barely acknowledged affection between the undersized and oft-humiliated middle-school title narrator (Zachary Gordon) and his tormenting teenage brother (Devon Bostick), drummer in the band "Löded Diper." Directed by former animator David Bowers, the film is essentially a feature-length sitcom episode, but it's often laugh-out-loud funny, and it respects its young audience.

Bartlett 10.

Fast Five (PG-13, 130 min.) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker.

Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic.

Green Lantern (PG-13, 114 min.) Director Martin Campbell ("The Mask of Zorro") delivers one of the goofier, less pretentious and more agreeably kid-friendly superhero action movies of the current cycle -- a film that seems charged not by the title hero's "power ring" but by the smiley hunkiness of star Ryan Reynolds, who is better known for his washboard abs and romantic resumé than his acting credits. Reynolds is cocky, courageous test pilot Hal Jordan, chosen -- as first revealed in the DC Comics series that began in 1959 -- to be a member of an intergalactic police force known as the "Green Lantern Corps," organized by the all-wise and all-wizened "Guardians of the Universe," a blue-faced race that inhabits the planet Yoda, er, Oa. The film squanders its rich source material; its digital effects, landscapes and supporting aliens are unconvincing and cartoonish; and it ruins one of the coolest costume designs in comic-book history by "enhancing" it with green-glowing highlights and musculature-like striations. Still, the movie's fun to watch, as Green Lantern battles both an evil-infected xenobiologist (a very amusing Peter Sarsgaard), who mutates into a sort of nerd Elephant Man, and a huge, amorphous, smoke-tendriled outer-space entity known as the Parallax, which feeds off "the yellow power of fear" and resembles the type of Rasta party wig a frat boy might wear to a Muck Sticky concert.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema, (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Raleigh Springs Cinema, Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Hangover Part II (R, 102 min.) Mistaking meanness for edge, borderline racism for irreverence and disregard for women as "boys will be boys" solidarity, this "Part II" is as horrifying as a "Saw" sequel, but with fewer laughs -- it may represent the ugliest portrait of a foreign land and culture since jailed American student Brad Davis was driven to bite off a stoolie's tongue in a hellhole Turkish prison in "Midnight Express." Director Tod Phillips basically repeats the ingenious formula of the first film, but ups the obnoxiousness: This time, the so-called "Wolfpack" (groom-to-be Ed Helms, smooth Bradley Cooper and weirdo man-child Zach Galifianakis) wakes up in Bangkok, again with no memory of the bachelor party-gone-bad the night before. Retracing their steps through a torture-porn slapstick Thailand that is so dirty, dangerous and disgusting that even its prostitutes are, in the film's view, monsters, the characters seem more like bullies than heroes, especially when they treat an ancient Buddhist monk like a comedy prop. Check it out, world: Americans overseas, running roughshod over the locals, wrecking the place, and returning home to laugh about it.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG, 85 min.) Voice of Hayden Panettiere.

Bartlett 10.

Insidious (PG-13, 103 min.) Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne.

Majestic, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8,

Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer (PG, 91 min.) Megan McDonald's popular book series for young readers comes to the screen.

Collierville Towne 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Jumping the Broom (PG-13, 113 min.) An all-star ensemble converges on Martha's Vineyard for a wedding.

Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG, 90 min.) The dark storyline -- parents, are you ready to explain panda genocide? -- seems more appropriate for a classic Shaw Brothers martial-arts film than for a spoofy pastiche, but the stunning production design and superb digital animation make this action-comedy (with a surprising emphasis on action) worth seeing. The voice actors return, including Jack Black as the roly-poly panda "dragon warrior," Po, and Dustin Hoffman as his Yoda-esque red panda mentor; the newcomer is Gary Oldman as a villainous peacock whose unfurled fanlike tail is one of the film's most striking visual elements. Directed by longtime animator Jennifer Yuh Nelson.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16, Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Limitless (PG-13, 106 min.) A top-secret drug transforms a sloppy underachiever (Bradley Cooper) into a stock market-exploiting, GQ-worthy superbrain in this intriguing, visually overstimulated thriller, which begins like an update of Roger Corman's "X -- The Man with the X-Ray Eyes" but abandons its probe of the soul-sucking price of power addiction to pander to the idea that audiences demand slick fantasy-role-model heroes and happy endings. Directed by Neil Burger ("The Illusionist"), from a novel by Alan Glynn.

Bartlett 10.

The Lincoln Lawyer (R, 119 min.) Matthew McConaughey, Marisa Tomei.

Bartlett 10.

Madea's Big Happy Family (PG-13, 105 min.) Tyler Perry doubles down on the comedy when his drag alter ego is joined by the rambunctious Aunt Bam (Cassi Davis).

Bartlett 10.

Midnight in Paris (PG-13, 100 min.) A somewhat stale bonbon with a tasty time-travel center, the latest wistful dispatch from writer-director Woody Allen stars Owen Wilson as a Paris-besotted "Hollywood hack" screenwriter with great-novelist aspirations who is transported, as if by magic, to the "Jazz Age" of 1920s Paris, where he meets and befriends his idols (depicted as amusing carictures), including Picasso, Hemingway and Gertrude Stein (Kathy Bates), who tells him the purpose of making art is "to find an antidote to the emptiness of existence." Directed with the wan functionality that has become Allen's trademark, the movie operates to some extent as a self-critique of the filmmaker's obsessive love of the past ("Nostalgia is denial," one character says) and his fantasy romanticism ("There is nothing beautiful about walking in the rain," asserts the writer's humorless fiancée, played by Rachel McAdams); a late twist invests this notion with surprising power, which is somewhat disippated by the supposedly soothing storybook ending.

Cordova Cinema, Ridgeway Four, Studio on the Square.

Mr. Popper's Penguins (PG, 95 min.) Big-city businessman Jim Carrey inherits a gaggle of arctic waterfowl in this adaptation of a 1938 children's book.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (PG-13, 137 min.) This fourth film in the series originally inspired by a Disney theme park ride chronicles a quest for the fabled fountain of youth, and the movie itself represents a desire for rejuvenation: It's an attempt to rewind the clock back, back, all the way back to those halcyon days of, um, 2003, when the lively, jokey "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl" was embraced by moviegoers and even most movie reviewers as a breath of fresh blockbuster air. Scuttling the unnavigable plot complications of the previous two sequels, this is essentially a rebooters' reboot, with Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) -- he of the carroty Coppertone sunburn, mincing Glimmer Twin body language, Foster Brooks slur and Bogey/Bugs Bunny facial tics -- reconnecting with the now peg-legged pirate Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush) and encountering zombies, mermaids, Blackbeard (Ian McShane) and Penélope Cruz, cast as a sort of swashbuckling projection of Sparrow's anima. New director Rob Marshall ("Chicago") is a less interesting filmmaker than his predecessor, Gore Verbinski, but his journeyman's approach helps shape the overstuffed story; the movie is overlong but entertaining, with a few standout sequences (the mermaids), and a relative coherence that is probably due to its source material. (The script was adapted for Sparrow from Tim Powers' 1987 fantasy pirate novel, "On Stranger Tides.")

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

Priest (PG-13, 88 min.) A horror/sci-fi revamp (pun intended) of "The Searchers," with vampires instead of Indians, a post-apocalyptic wasteland instead of Monument Valley and a kung-fu warrior priest (Paul Bettany) instead of John Wayne, on the hunt for his kidnapped niece (Lily Collins, last seen as the Tuohy daughter in "The Blind Side"). The inspiration may be John Ford and the credited source may be a Korean comic book, but director Scott Charles Stewart ("Legion") delivers something that resembles one of producer Roger Corman's 1980s "Mad Max" rip-offs, but pumped up with charmless and overbusy 21st-century digital effects.

Bartlett 10.

Rango (PG, 107 min.) Voice of Johnny Depp.

Bartlett 10.

Rio (G, 99 min.) A pampered pet Minnesota macaw named Blu (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) who never learned to fly is brought to Brazil to mate with proudly independent Jewel (Anne Hathaway) and save their species in this colorful, musical computer-animated film from Rio-born director Carlos Saldanha and Blue Sky Studios ("Ice Age"). The urban/tropical landscapes and Carnival backdrop add vibrancy to a smart romance-adventure that borrows from classic Bob Hope suspense-comedies and even Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" as the nebbishy Blu and the sassy Jewel flee from exotic-bird thieves and, inevitably, fall into each other's, um, wings. A treat for grownups as well as kids.

Bartlett 10.

Something Borrowed (PG-13, 113 min.) Ginnifer Goodwin, Kate Hudson.

Bartlett 10.

Soul Surfer (PG, 106 min.) AnnaSophia Robb, Dennis Quaid.

Bartlett 10.

Super 8 (PG-13, 112 min.) Producer Steven Spielberg and geek-beloved writer-director J.J. Abrams have delivered the season's best "summer movie" -- a popcorn blockbuster made with craft, care, enthusiasm, genuine affection for its characters and respect for its audience. It's entirely derivative, yet in this season of sequels and remakes and snark, it feels not just fresh but refreshing -- a tonic that restores one's appreciation for the commercial moviegoing experience. A science-fiction throwback times two set in 1979, the movie is an extended homage to the boys'-own-adventure "classic Spielberg" era of "E.T." and "The Goonies," but it also harks back to the monster movies of the 1950s, as a government train wreck looses something large and dangerous and (for most of the movie) unseen onto a small Ohio town, where a grieving middle-school kid (impressive newcomer Joel Courtney), his crush-worthy classmate (Elle Fanning) and their pals are making Super-8 monster home movies, just like the young Spielberg and Abrams did. Ultimately, the film is hurt by its lack of originality; the problematic characterization and muddled metaphoric significance of the alternately murderous and sympathetic/therapeutic monster; and the characteristically Spielbergian situational science of its science fiction: The powers and actions of the creature seem arbitrary, motivated more by the desire to generate a spectacular effect for a specific scene than by any sort of consistent internal logic.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square.

Thor (PG-13, 114 min.) Entertaining and instantly forgettable, the latest Marvel Comics would-be blockbuster is as much a promo for the upcoming "Avengers" superteam flick as an origin story, as moviegoers are introduced to the title Norse God of Thunder (a perfectly cast Chris Hemsworth), who is exiled to Earth from the "Realm Eternal" of Asgard by his father, Odin (Anthony Hopkins), who hopes his impetuous son will develop insight and maturity to match the muscles that enable him to heft Mjolnir, his mighty magic hammer. As expected, director Kenneth Branagh is comfortable with the faux-Shakespearean dialogue of the Asgardians, and he handles the action and drama efficiently (I've always enjoyed Branagh's signature use of Dutch angles); but the multimillion-dollar computer-generated environments and effects seen here pale next to the singular imagination on display in Jack Kirby's drawings in the old Thor comic books. Natalie Portman is charming if unnecessary as the Earth astrophysicist smitten by Thor's golden locks and silver tongue; Tom Hiddleston is amusing as Thor's treacherous "brother" god, Loki.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Transformers: Dark of the Moon (PG-13, 157 min.) Opened Tuesday. See review on Page 12.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Raleigh Springs Cinema, Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Studio on the Square.

The Tree of Life (PG-13, 138 min.) Many moviegoers will reject this film's glacial pacing, its whispery voiceovers, its lengthy cosmic detour to the birth of the universe (the ultimate flashback!), its religious -- even Christian -- implications. But sympathetic viewers will find themselves stirred, moved and spellbound by a frequently confounding, arguably overreaching project that just might be a great work of art: a film that aspires to be as mysterious and powerful -- and as attuned to the miraculous -- as the Episcopal service attended by its central family, or the baby's birth that functions as its core event. The bulk of this fifth feature film in almost 40 years from writer-director Terrence Malick consists of an extraordinarily convincing and intimate if dreamlike portrait of a family in a leafy postwar Waco, Texas. The stern father (Brad Pitt) seems to represent "the way of nature"; the forgiving mother (Jessica Chastain) offers "the way of grace"; while the often angry pre-adolescent son (Hunter McCracken, a remarkable newcomer -- represented as an adult by Sean Penn) is torn between violence and empathy. From its backyard realism to its lengthy detours deep into both outer space (the "astrophysical realm," according to the end credits) and the primordial stew (the "microbial realm"), this is the rare film that asks the moviegoer to be a participant -- a collaborator -- in its meaning, rather than merely a spectator. The camera frequently follows the characters so closely that it becomes a ghostly companion; in essence, our point of view becomes that of an attendant spirit, eavesdropping as the characters ask such terrifying questions as, "Lord, why -- where are you?" and: "Who are we to you?"

Ridgeway Four.

Water for Elephants (PG-13, 121 min.) Reese Witherspoon.

Bartlett 10.

X-Men: First Class (PG-13, 132 min.) Say it loud, I'm mutant and I'm proud: As perhaps befits the early 1960s setting, this origin story from director Matthew Vaughn ("Kick-Ass") de-emphasizes the coming-out motif of the previous X-Men films to embed a racial metaphor (blue-skinned Mystique, played by Jennifer Lawrence, learns to accept her dark complexion and un-straight hair) within its Marvel Comics superheroics, "alternate history" science-fiction (the X-Men are part of the Cuban Missile Crisis) and James Bond-esque Cold War international intrigue (Kevin Bacon is Sebastian Shaw, a sort of mutant Blofeld; his companion is January Jones, whose signature hardness and coldness are put to good use -- she's Emma Frost, who can transform herself into living diamond). James McAvoy is the young Charles Xavier (not yet paralyzed or bald); cool Michael Fassbender is the Holocaust survivor who will become the antagonistic master of metal, Magneto. The supporting mutants -- the blue-furred Beast, the winged Angel Salvadore, the chest-beam-blasting Havok -- are goofy enough that their battles suggest Toho monster rallies, especially when Banshee (Caleb Landry Jones) blows sonic energy rings, like the baby dinosaur in "Son of Godzilla."

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Summer Quartet Drive-In, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

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Comments » 1

jcbosch#683430 writes:

Conservatives will find "Bad Teacher" funnier than liberals like Beifuss. It's because Diaz is so immune to guilt. Liberals just drink up guilt. It's not as good as bridesmaids, no, but pretty funny. And he's wrong about the "Amy Squirrel" character. Nobody roots for her. Unlike "bad teacher," Amy tries to destroy her rival and only because she's jealous.

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