Movie Capsules: Now showing

Laz Alonso and Paula Patton are shown in a scene from 'Jumping the Broom.'

Photo by AP Photo/Sony-TriStar Pictures, Jonathan Wenk

Laz Alonso and Paula Patton are shown in a scene from "Jumping the Broom."

Capsule descriptions by The Commercial Appeal movie writer John Beifuss.

OPENING TODAY

Jumping the Broom (PG-13, 113 min.) An all-star ensemble -- Angela Bassett, Paula Patton, Loretta Devine -- converges on Martha's Vineyard for a wedding.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Something Borrowed (PG-13, 113 min.) See review on Page 12.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Thor (PG-13, 114 min.) By Odin's beard, it's another Marvel Comics superhero epic.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Studio on the Square, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D).

SPECIAL MOVIES

The Barons (Not rated, 111 min.) In recognition of the Memphis in May International Festival, Indie Memphis continues its series of Belgian films with this international-fest award-winner about the misadventures of a trio of young loafers in the Arab "ghetto" of Brussels.

7 p.m. Thursday, Studio on the Square. Admission: $7, or $5 for Indie Memphis members. Visit indiememphis.com.

The Circus (Not rated, 71 min.) At the first Academy Awards ceremony in 1929, Charlie Chaplin was given a special statuette "for versatility and genius in writing, acting, directing and producing" this classic comedy, in which the Little Tramp becomes an accidental big-top star.

2 p.m. Sunday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: $8, or $6 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

Hubble: Narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio, this new IMAX film explores the legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope and its impact on our understanding of the universe. Runs through Nov. 11. Tickets $8, $7.25 senior citizens, $6.25 children ages 3-12; children under 3 free.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

Indie Memphis Student Shorts Competition: Students from Rhodes College, the Memphis College of Art, St. Agnes Academy, Overton High School and elsewhere screen their short films.

4 p.m. Saturday, Callicott Auditorium, Memphis College of Art. Admission: Free. Visit indiememphis.com.

Legends of Flight: Experience aerial innovation at the dawn of a new era in flight transportation; an insider's view of how a modern aircraft is built. Through Nov. 11. Tickets $8, $7.25 senior citizens, $6.25 children ages 3-12; children under 3 free.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

Metropolitan Opera: Capriccio (Not rated, 205 min.) An encore presentation of the recent New York production of Richard Strauss' 1942 masterpiece about a countess torn between her love for a poet and a composer. (In other words, which is more important: Words or music?)

6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Paradiso. Tickets: $20. Visit malco.com.

The Over the Hill Band (Not rated, 93 min.) In recognition of the Memphis in May International Festival, Indie Memphis continues its series of Belgian films with this charmer about a recently widowed septuagenarian who tries to reunite her 1960s "girl group."

2 p.m. Saturday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Admission: $7, or $5 for museum and Indie Memphis members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

Their Eyes Were Dry (Not rated, 105 min.) A new documentary about the 1974 "Ma'alot Massacre," in which terrorists invaded an Israeli elementary school, is followed by a pre-recorded concert featuring the All-Star Cantors Assembly, performing songs celebrating Israeli Independence Day.

7 p.m. Monday, Paradiso. Tickets: $12.50. Visit malco.com.

NOW SHOWING

The Adjustment Bureau (PG-13, 99 min.) Matt Damon, Emily Blunt.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

African Cats (G, 89 min.) A Disney nature documentary about lions and cheetahs and their cubs.

Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Arthur (PG-13, 110 min.) Cartoonish Russell Brand takes the Dudley Moore role in debuting feature director Jason Winer's unsteady remake of the 1981 smash-hit romantic comedy about an alcoholic multimillionaire man-child who discovers -- cue Christopher Cross -- that "the best that you can do is fall in love."

Palace Cinema.

Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13, 102 min.) Paul Johansson.

Ridgeway Four.

Battle Los Angeles (PG-13, 117 min.) Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez.

Bartlett 10.

Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son (PG-13, 108 min.) Martin Lawrence, Brandon T. Jackson.

Bartlett 10.

Blue Valentine (R, 113 min.) Ryan Gosling (who comes across as a show-off "method" actor who's only pretending to be a husband/housepainter) and Oscar-nominated Michelle Williams (natural and convincing as a nurse/wife/mother) star in this chronologically fractured portrait of the rise and collapse of a youthful, working-class romance, which gets under the viewer's skin despite the paradoxical inauthenticity of director Derek Cianfrance's gritty, documentary-esque visuals and the largely improvised performances. "How do you trust your feelings when they can just disappear like that?" says the Williams character, likely speaking for all moviegoers at some time in their lives; her partner expresses another sad truth when he strums his ukulele and nasally sings "You Always Hurt the One You Love."

Bartlett 10.

The Conspirator (PG-13, 122 min.) A fascinating, little-known episode in American history provides a pretext for a post-9/11 allegory and a related lecture on constitutional law in the latest yawner from director Robert Redford, a man whose politics are now easier to admire than his movies. Robin Wright -- excellent in a role that mostly requires her to maintain a Christ-like preternatural dignity in the face of unjust, imminent execution -- stars as Mary Surratt, the only woman charged as a co-conspirator in what is referred to as "the most grievous crime in our nation's history," the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules (PG, 100 min.) Inspired by the Jeff Kinney book series.

Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG-13, 107 min.) (Zero stars) Entirely derivative and utterly wretched, this dead-on-arrival horror comedy-mystery stars a miscast Brandon Routh as the title tough-guy detective, who investigates vampires and werewolves in New Orleans with the aid of a "comic" yet unfunny zombie sidekick (Sam Huntington). Directed by Kevin Munroe, the film -- adapted from an Italian comic book series -- has the glossy yet low-budget and soulless look of a failed TV pilot; it fails to provide even campy fun.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Cordova Cinema, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Fast Five (PG-13, 130 min.) A pedal-to-the-metal paean to reckless driving and fuel inefficiency, this fifth film in the rubber-burning franchise is the most spectacular and elaborate yet, bringing new meaning to the term "muscle car" by pitting series regular Vin Diesel (who plays an ex-con street racer) against former wrestling superstar Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson (who plays a U.S. super-agent). When the two bodybuilding behemoths finally go toe to toe and pec to pec, the movie achieves its "King Kong vs. Godzilla" moment -- but even that Rumble in Rio pales in comparison to the giddy high-speed chase finale in which Diesel and co-star Paul Walker destroy much of Brazil's mecca of tourism and tropicália by towing a gigantic bank vault through the streets, wiping out lampposts, storefronts and pursuing police vehicles as the strong box -- "ten tons of top-of-the-line security" -- swings from side to side like a cubical wrecking ball. Directed (like the previous two installments) by Justin Lin, the movie is part action epic, part heist film, as Diesel and Walker assemble what might be called the Fast & Furious All-Stars (Tyrese Gibson, Ludacris, Sung Kang) to steal $100 million from the drug lord who framed them for murder. This 'B' picture on steroids offers plenty of reasons -- all legitimate -- to go to the movies, including car wrecks, wisecracks, picturesque locations, female extras in skimpy outfits and strong men with huge muscles. However, the cavalier and self-centered attitude of the "heroes" toward the violence and destruction they cause is troubling, in part because this sense of entitlement is too often seen -- and tolerated -- in real-life politicians, entertainers and business executives.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Gnomeo & Juliet (G, 84 min.) Voices of Emily Blunt and James McAvoy.

Bartlett 10.

Hall Pass (R, 108 min.) Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis.

Bartlett 10.

Hanna (PG-13, 111 min.) Saoirse Ronan is remarkable in the title role of this beautifully crafted coming-of-age story/chase thriller about an adolescent assassin whose marksmanship and multilingualism don't prepare her for the challenges of teenage friendship or kissing (an activity that "requires a total of 34 facial muscles," she recites, as efficiently as Watson on "Jeopardy!").

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Cordova Cinema.

Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG, 85 min.) Like its predecessor, "Hoodwinked," which earned $51 million at the less-'toon-saturated box office of 2005, this is an intermittently amusing smart-aleck fairy-tale spoof, inspired by the success of the "Shrek" franchise but justifying its cheap-looking digital animation by also paying homage to the less-pretentious era of "Fractured Fairy Tales" on TV's Rocky and Bullwinkle programs. Taken in small doses, the fairy-tale "Dragnet" premise and anti-Pixar casualness of these movies would make for decent Saturday morning fodder, but the feature-length format makes one all too aware that the visuals are crummy and the comedy is lame, consisting almost entirely of "Family Guy"-style non sequiturs and tired pop-culture references to "Star Wars," "Scarface," "Silence of the Lambs" and so on. Adding economic injury to aesthetic insult, director Mike Disa's movie is in 3-D, which means the tickets carry a surcharge: The extra expense gets you not just a temporary pair of glasses but 11 minutes of end credits, to pad the film to its dubious 85-minute running time. Hayden Panettiere (replacing Anne Hathaway) provides the voice of Red Riding Hood (whose moxie and martial artistry should amuse young girls); Patrick Warburton returns as the Big Bad Wolf.

Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D)

Hop (PG, 95 min.) A young computer-animated rabbit (voiced by Russell Brand) who is destined to be the next Easter Bunny hops away from home to seek fame as a rock drummer in live-action Hollywood in this tiresome holiday-themed (but utterly secularized) "Alvin and the Chipmunks" retread from "Alvin" director Tim Hill. The bunny wears a Stax T-shirt and jams with the Blind Boys of Alabama, but he's a poseur: On his own, he drums along to soulless auto-tuned corporate pop-rock. He also poops jelly beans, which provides a nice metaphor: The film is slick and colorful, but it's formulaic crap.

Majestic, DeSoto Cinema 16, CinePlanet 16.

I Am Number Four (PG-13, 110 min.) Alex Pettyfer, Dianna Agron.

Bartlett 10.

Insidious (PG-13, 103 min.) For one loopy moment in this unpretentious we-just-want-to-scare-you horror movie, the trilly sound of "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" wafts through a spook-plagued California home, and it seems as if the story's unfortunate family is being haunted by the ghosts of Tiny Tim and his ukulele. No such luck: In an inevitable letdown, the chief demon/poltergeist isn't a pasty-faced vibrato song stylist but what appears to be a cloven-hoofed Darth Maul. Even so, producer Oren Peli ("Paranormal Activity") and the "Saw" team of writer Leigh Whannell and director James Wan have delivered an efficient chiller, which favors loud BUMPS in the night and other gore-free frights over explicit gross-outs. The story is pure "Poltergeist," as suburban couple Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne hire spiritualist Lin Shaye and her team of ghost-hunting techno-nerds to rescue their comatose young son from the threat of supernatural possession.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Jane Eyre (PG-13, 120 min.) Mia Wasikowska is remarkable as the timorous yet tough title governess in this tenth (at least) filmed adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's proto-feminist 1847 novel of Gothic romance. Shooting in the English Midlands countryside, director Cary Joji Fukunaga ("Sin Nombre") conjures an authentically mysterious/beautiful milieu, while scripter Moira Buffini preserves the elaborately polite (however menacing) and formal language that is one of the novel's chief delights. The film is marred only by an anti-climactic final act, in which Jane seeks shelter with a minister (Jamie Bell) and his sisters as we impatiently wait for her to reunite with her former employer and tragically burdened potential lifemate, Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

Studio on the Square.

Limitless (PG-13, 106 min.) Bradley Cooper, Robert De Niro.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema.

The Lincoln Lawyer (R, 119 min.) Crackerjack plotting and characterization (credit the source novel by Michael Connelly) compensate for tired, even annoying visuals (blame the ADD camerawork and oversaturated color scheme on director Brad Furman) in this entertaining legal thriller, which resembles a very well-executed TV pilot. Matthew McConaughey is made to order for the role of fast-talking, faster-thinking Los Angeles defense attorney Mickey Haller, who must use all his wiles to bring a killer to justice when he discovers he's being manipulated by a clever, sadistic client. With Marisa Tomei as Haller's ex-wife and Ryan Phillippe as a privileged fiend.

Collierville Towne 16.

Madea's Big Happy Family (PG-13, 105 min.) Tyler Perry doubles down on the comedy when his drag alter ego is joined by the equally rambunctious Aunt Bam (Cassi Davis).

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Madea Goes to Jail (PG-13, 103 min.) The title promises to return the spotlight (as well as the prison-yard searchlight) to Tyler Perry's signature drag comedy creation, the pistol-packing, straight-talking Madea; but unfortunately (if not unpredictably), the writer-director devotes much of the film to a simplistic Christian morality tale about a young lawyer (Derek Luke) who jeopardizes his impending marriage by saving an old classmate (former "Cosby" kid Keshia Knight Pulliam) from her life of drug addiction and prostitution. Marginal details are more interesting than the action at center stage, as when Perry stages a meeting of assistant district attorneys that includes but one token white guy, in a reversal of the typical movie casting decision. The standout in the ensemble cast is Viola Davis, who brings welcome depth to the stock role of a social reformer.

Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Of Gods and Men (R, 122 min.) Faith in God, faith in humanity, faith in cinema -- only the last of these seems immune to doubt while one is watching this beautiful, thought-provoking feature, winner of the 2011 César Award (the French equivalent of the Oscar) for Best Film. The rare movie that treats religious commitment with respect and regards nonviolence as a legitimate, honorable response to brutality, the film is extraordinarily timely in its depiction of the threat of Islamic extremism in a restless Arab world but self-consciously timeless in its portrayal of a contemplativ nd prayerful, monastic lifestyle that has endured for centuries. Inspired by a tragic 1996 true story that is much remembered in France if not in the U.S., the film focuses on a small community of French Trappist monks in Algeria whose peaceful co-existence with the Muslims of a nearby village is threatened by a rising, bloody tide of terrorism. The dilemma becomes: Should the monks risk their lives by remaining in the country they love, or flee to do good work elsewhere? With his unhurried storytelling style and deceptively placid mise-en-scène, director Xavier Beauvois constructs a film that is itself intended to be a sort of holy place, like the simple monastery occupied by the lead characters. The monks and the film embrace a message that is nothing short of radical: "Denounce the temptation of force and power."

Ridgeway Four.

Prom (PG, 103 min.) A Disney high school comedy-drama.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Red Riding Hood (PG-13, 100 min.) Draped in the blood-hued garment that symbolizes the onset of sexual maturity (hence, her appeal to "wolves"), Amanda Seyfried stars as the title fairy tale heroine, and my, what big eyes she has. The better to see -- what? Like director Catherine Hardwicke's previous features ("Thirteen," "Twilight," and, yes, "The Nativity Story"), this is an extreme coming-of-age story about young people coping with extraordinary circumstances, but the soap opera/murder mystery tone is wobbly and the focus is unclear.

Bartlett 10, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Rio (G, 99 min.) A pampered pet Minnesota macaw named Blu (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) who never learned to fly is brought to Brazil to mate with proudly independent Jewel (Anne Hathaway) and save their species in this colorful, musical computer-animated film from Rio-born director Carlos Saldanha and Blue Sky Studios ("Ice Age"). The urban/tropical landscapes and Carnival backdrop add vibrancy to a smart romance-adventure that borrows from classic Bob Hope suspense-comedies and even Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" as the nebbishy Blu and the sassy Jewel flee from exotic-bird thieves and, inevitably, fall into each other's, um, wings. A treat for grownups as well as kids.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Majestic, Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Raleigh Springs Cinema, Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Roommate (PG-13, 92 min.) Minka Kely, Leighton Meeser.

Bartlett 10.

Scream 4 (R, 112 min.) Director Wes Craven, writer Kevin Williamson and stars Neve Campbell (the "survivor"), Courtney Cox (the reporter) and David Arquette (the cop) are back in this effective "Ghostface Killer" franchise revival, aimed at the plugged-in social-media teen generation represented by such series newcomers as Emma Roberts (who plays Campbell's niece), Rory Culkin (a geeked-out cinephile) and Hayden Panettiere (a stylish smart-aleck). The self-referential "meta" cleverness of what may be the talkiest slasher film ever made may annoy viewers who prefer their scares straight, but the movie works as both a well-cast horror-comedy and a multiple-suspects mystery thriller that demonstrates that the sudden ring of an old-fashioned telephone is a lot scarier than any downloaded ringtone or text-message ping.

Majestic, DeSoto Cinema 16, Raleigh Springs Cinema, Palace Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Soul Surfer (PG, 106 min.) AnnaSophia Robb stars as blond, ukulele-strumming Bethany Hamilton in this true-life parable of the 13-year-old Hawaiian girl who returned to competitive surfing after losing her left arm to a shark attack. A sincere and well-made tale of teenage triumph set against the warm backdrops of the beautiful Pacific surf and the minimally referenced Christian faith of the lead characters, director Sean McNamara's movie should prove especially engrossing to young girls eager for purposeful role models and be especially appealing to parents seeking wholesome but not inane entertainment for their daughters. With Dennis Quaid -- who, at 56, still has a broadly boyish surfer-dude smile -- and Helen Hunt as Bethany's loving, sandaled-and-swimsuited parents.

Stage Cinema, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Source Code (PG-13, 93 min.) Director Duncan Jones (the son of David Bowie) follows his striking feature debut "Moon" with a confident action-suspenser about a soldier (Jake Gyllenhaal) who wakes up in another man's body on a doomed Chicago commuter train and discovers he's part of a military program that essentially enables him to re-live eight minutes of the past. His mission: discover the identity of the terrorist who bombed the train. A sort of science-fiction "Groundhog Day," the movie is thoughtful and well-made, but undercut by final-act illogic and a forced "happy" ending that is anything but happy for the man whose body the soldier is inhabiting.

Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Collierville Towne 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Sucker Punch (PG-13, 110 min.) Emily Browning, Jena Malone.

Bartlett 10.

Unknown (PG-13, 113 min.) Liam Neeson, January Jones.

Bartlett 10.

Water for Elephants (PG-13, 121 min.) With unlikely director Francis Lawrence ("I Am Legend," "Constantine") at the helm, Sara Gruen's best-seller becomes an engrossing, old-fashioned romantic-triangle motion picture with appeal for both men and women -- in other words, the type of movie that used to be a Hollywood staple. The Depression-era traveling circus setting adds novelty and color as a young veterinary student (Robert Pattinson) in charge of a big-top menagerie has his life changed by two females: an elegant equestrian (Reese Witherspoon) and Rosie, the elephant. As the equestrian's sadistic husband and circus boss, Christoph Waltz -- in what might be called the Lionel Atwill role -- provides enough scene-stealing flamboyance to compensate for the serviceable blandness of the leads.

Ridgeway Four, Forest Hill 8, Stage Cinema, Collierville Towne 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Studio on the Square, Cordova Cinema, Paradiso, Hollywood 20 Cinema, CinePlanet 16.

Win Win (R, 106 min.) The third feature from writer-director Tom McCarthy ("The Station Agent," "The Visitor") is perhaps more timid than its predecessors, but it's honest, resourceful and funny. Paul Giamatti stars as a hangdog New Jersey lawyer, family man and high-school wrestling coach stressed by "work, money, everything"; newcomer Paul Shaffer is the taciturn teen runaway and wrestling phenom whose unexpected arrival in the lawyer's life proves to be both a complication and a blessing. As the movie's believable if frequently comical characters cope with economic responsibilities and emotional challenges while also working to make amends for poor decisions, you may be reminded in some ways of a good episode of "The Andy Griffith Show" -- and I mean that as praise.

Ridgeway Four.

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