Movie Capsules: Now showing

Intrepid boy reporter Tintin (center) and his faithful terrier Snowy join forces with drunken Captain Haddock (left) in 'The Adventures of Tintin.'

WETA Digital Ltd.

Intrepid boy reporter Tintin (center) and his faithful terrier Snowy join forces with drunken Captain Haddock (left) in "The Adventures of Tintin."

Capsule descriptions by The Commercial Appeal movie writer John Beifuss.

OPENING FRIDAY

The Artist (PG-13, 100 min.) See review.

Ridgeway Four.

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG-13, 129 min.) See review.5

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square.

Haywire (R, 93 min.) Mixed martial arts champion and movie neophyte Gina Carano is a vengeful "black ops super soldier" in the first all-out action film from director Steven Soderbergh.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Red Tails (PG-13, 125 min.) See review on Page 16.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Shame (NC-17, 101 min.) See review4.

Studio on the Square.

Underworld: Awakening (R, 89 min.) Kate Beckinsale rejoins the battle of human vs. "lycan" vs. vamp.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Summer Quartet Drive-In.

SPECIAL MOVIES

Born To Be Wild: The latest IMAX film is "an inspiring story of love, dedication and the remarkable bond between humans and animals" that focuses on efforts to reintroduce rescued elephants and orangutans into the wild. Narrated by Morgan Freeman. Runs through Nov. 16.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call (901) 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

The British Arrows Awards (Not rated, 75 min.) Formerly known as the British Television Advertising Awards, the annual anthology of the United Kingdom's wittiest, sexiest and most epic TV commercials has become one of the Brooks Museum's most popular screening events. The awards anthology repeats Jan. 27-29.

7 p.m. Thursday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Tickets: $8, or $6 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

Cafeteria Man (Not rated, 65 min.) Acclaimed filmmaker Richard Chisolm directed this in-depth documentary about Chef Anthony "Tony" Geraci's surprisingly controversial mission to bring healthy lunches to Baltimore's inner-city schools. Chisolm, Geraci and others will participate in a question-and- answer panel discussion after the screening.

4 p.m. Saturday, Studio on the Square. Tickets: $10 at the door, or $5 in advance through cafeteriaman.eventbrite.com.

The Hedgehog (Not rated, 100 min.) A highly intelligent but deepy bored 11-year-old Parisian plans to kill herself on her 12th birthday until she meets some eccentric kindred spirits in her own building. This 2009 French film was directed by Mona Achache, from Muriel Barbery's international bestseller, "The Elegance of the Hedgehog."

2 p.m. Saturday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Tickets: $8, or $6 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

The Metropolitan Opera: The Enchanted island (Not rated, 195 min.) In this new work, the lovers from Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" are stranded on the island from "The Tempest"; the musical sources include Handel and Vivaldi, and the all-star cast features Plácido Domingo as Neptune. Presented live via satellite from New York.

11:55 a.m. Saturday, Paradiso. Tickets: $20. Visit malco.com.

Opera in Cinema: Cendrillon (Not rated, 170 min.) A recent production of Massenet's four-act fairy tale, based on Charles Perrault's 1698 story, "Cinderella," filmed live onstage at London's Royal Opera House.

2 p.m. Sunday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Tickets: $15, or $12 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

3 Superstars in Berlin (Not rated, 135 min.) Billed as "opera's hottest stars," Jonas Kaufmann, Anna Netrebko and Erwin Schrott come together for a filmed-live-onstage concert.

7 p.m. Thursday, Paradiso. Tickets: $20. Visit malco.com.

The Ultimate Wave Tahiti: Viewers will learn how waves influence and shape our planet while they ride alongside champion surfer Kelly Slater as he challenges Tahiti's toughest wave. Runs through March 2. Tickets $8.25, $7.50 senior citizens, $6.50 children ages 3-12 and children under 3 free.

IMAX Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call (901) 320-6362 for show times, tickets and reservations.

NOW SHOWING

The Adventures of Tintin (PG, 107 min.) As frenetic if hardly as entertaining as "Raiders of the Lost Ark," this "performance capture" animated film from director Steven Spielberg and producer Peter Jackson ("the two greatest storytellers of our time," according to the immodest trailer) introduces us to its boyish newspaper reporter hero as he is being caricatured by a street artist. The resulting sketch is based on one of the signature drawings of Tintin by the young hero's creator, the late Belgian comic-book artist known as Hergé; unfortunately, the portrait calls our attention to the contrast between the wit, economy and charm of Hergé's original art and the expensive, labor-intensive kitsch of the performance-capture images. The action set pieces are spectacular, as Tintin (voiced/enacted by Jamie Bell), his fox terrier, Snowy, and new drunken ally, Captain Haddock (the performance-capture Man of a Thousand LED Faces, Andy Serkis), race against an evil adversary (Daniel Craig) to claim a sunken pirate treasure, but Tintin remains a dull if intrepid blank; we don't identify with him or fear for his safety, so his adventures leave us breathless with exhaustion, not excitement.

Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Stage Cinema.

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G, 90 min.) Another "squeakquel."

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

Beauty and the Beast (G, 91 min.) The 1991 Disney animated classic returns, converted into 3D.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Stage Cinema (in 3-D).

Carnage (R, 79 min.) Adapted from Yasmina Reza's "God of Carnage," which won the Tony Award for best play in 2009, director Roman Polanski's new film is an extremely black comedy of physical confinement and social breakdown from a man well acquainted -- in his life and his art -- with the shifting boundaries of accountability, culpability and freedom of expression and movement. (Polanski grew up in a ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland; he's now a fugitive from U.S. justice, after fleeing California in 1978 rather than face sentencing on a charge of "unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor.") Set in "real time" in a comfortable but smallish Brooklyn apartment, the movie is part "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," part "The Exterminating Angel" and almost all conversation as it observes the veiled insults, hysterical self-righteousness and smug insinuations delivered by a pair of parents (Jodie Foster and John C. Reilly, and Kate Winslet and Christoph Waltz) who have met to discuss an incident in which one couple's son whacked the other couple's son with a stick. At one point, the Winslet character admires a coffee table book about Francis Bacon and refers to the artist's "cruelty and splendor": That's not a bad term to apply to the Polanski filmography ("The Pianist," "Rosemary's Baby," "Chinatown"), which is enhanced by this deceptively minor but insidious work.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Contraband (R, 110 min.) Mark Wahlberg and Kate Beckinsale in a race-against-the-clock crime thriller.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

Courageous (PG-13, 130 min.) Four Christian sheriff's deputies and their new Latin amigo (I'm resisting using the word "mascot") struggle with the responsibilities of work and family in this fourth feature film from Albany, Georgia's Sherwood Pictures, the startlingly successful "movie ministry" of Sherwood Baptist Church.

Bartlett 10.

The Darkest Hour (PG-13, 89 min.) The kills are super-cool, as invisible energy "ghosts" from outer space flash-fry humans (and dogs) in dust-devil swirls of ash and spark; unfortunately, everything else is utterly perfunctory in this alien invasion mini-epic that presents trapped-in-Moscow twentysomethings Emile Hirsch, Max Minghella and Olivia Thirlby as the potential saviors of Earth. Poor Earth. Directed by Chris Gorak.

DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Descendants (R, 115 min.) A certain contender for most of the major Oscars, the first film in seven years from director Alexander Payne ("Sideways") casts George Clooney as Matt King, a haole (white person in Hawaii) lawyer with royal Hawaiian blood who is facing two terrible deadlines: As trustee, he must determine what to do with his family's "huge parcel of virgin land," worth millions; and as husband, he has to decide when to pull the plug on his comatose wife. Payne -- whose other films include "Election" and "About Schmidt" -- specializes in depictions of aging white males in crisis; he's a humanist director who favors people over style and confrontations and conversations over set pieces, but he relies too much on storytelling crutches (Matt's voiceover narration is annoying and redundant). Beautifully shot on location, the film becomes more enjoyable and somehow even looser as its plot tightens (Matt learns his wife was having an affair), and the focus expands to Matt's relationship with his two daughters, a troubled teenager (Oscar-worthy Shailene Woodley) and an eccentric youngster (Amara Miller). The memorable supporting cast includes Nick Krause as an affable teen stoner named Sid, and Robert Forster as Matt's belligerent father-in-law.

Cordova Cinema, Ridgeway Four.

The Devil Inside (R, 87 min.) The faux-documentary "Blair Witch"/"Paranormal Activity" format continues to pay off financially if not artistically: Acquired by Paramount for a measly $1 million, this shoestring production earned almost $35 million on its opening weekend in the U.S. The second fake "found footage" demon-possession thriller in less than three years (after 2010's "The Last Exorcism"), director William Brent Bell's film follows a young American (Fernanda Adrade) to Italy, where a pair of rogue priests (Simon Quarterman and Evan Helmuth) from her exorcism class (really) agree to help drive the devil from her insane mother (Suzan Crowley, who at least bears an appropriate surname). The few shocks don't make up for the implausibility of the story or the recklessness of the "heroes." To pad the running time, the end credits roll at a snail's pace; they do reveal the interesting fact that the possessed woman's "contortionist double" is one "Pixie Le Knot."

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

Footloose (PG-13, 113 min.) Kenny Wormald, Julianne Hough.

Bartlett 10.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R, 158 min.) Director David Fincher's adaptation of Stieg Larsson's phenomenally successful international best-seller is a movie of extreme length as well as unassailable technical polish and posh production values, but the gloss doesn't hide the gruesomeness: In its bid to be the first major-studio "mainstream" franchise worthy of its R rating, "Girl" is unflinching in its intermittent depiction of sexual exploitation and brutality. It's this injustice that motivates the series' indelible outsider avenger heroine, Lisbeth Salander, portrayed with a remarkable mix of confidence and vulnerability by Rooney Mara; Daniel Craig is the disgraced investigative journalist who recruits the punk-garbed genius computer hacker to help investigate a decades-old disappearance connected to a savage string of Bible-inspired murders. With its cold and spooky Scandinavian mise-en-scène, which merges hard-angled IKEA modernism with the misty irrationality of a Nordic fairy tale, the film is superior to the Swedish version of "Girl" that appeared in 2009, but it's not as gripping as Fincher's previous serial-killer masterpiece, "Zodiac." Even so, it reminds us why murder mysteries and investigative procedurals -- useful parables about the certainty of death that have pretty much migrated to television -- can be especially compelling in a darkened theater.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square.

Happy Feet Two (PG, 103 min.) Director George Miller's sequel to his 2006 Best Animated Feature Oscar-winner is a pointless and plotless disappointment, but it gives a major role to Memphis kid rapper Lil P-Nut, who supplies the voice of a scene-stealing fat-and-fluffy kid penguin named Atticus, whose take on LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out" ("Don't call it a comeback!") was a major part of the ad campaign.

Bartlett 10, Majestic.

Hugo (PG, 127 min.) Advertised as a children's adventure, Martin Scorsese's first 3D feature might more accurately be described as a love letter to cinema, set in the city of storybook romance, Paris. Even the movie's clockwork automaton is motivated by a symbol of love: It is brought to life by a key shaped like a Valentine's heart. Asa Butterfield stars as Hugo, a young 1930s orphan who lives in hiding in a bustling train station, where he tends the great clocks; aided by a precocious, book-smart girl (Chloë Grace Moretz), he uncovers a mystery involving a toymaker (Ben Kingsley) and a real-life master of cinematic invention and special effects, Georges Méliès, a stage magician turned filmmaker who marvels that the movies represented "a new kind of magic" -- a statement that endorses Scorsese's decision to embrace the spirit of Méliès and explore the new magic of digital 3D.

Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), Studio on the Square (in 3-D), Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8 (in 3-D).

Immortals (R, 110 min.) Henry Cavill, Mickey Rourke.

Bartlett 10.

In Time (PG-13, 110 min.) One of the few legitimate science-fiction specialists in Hollywood, writer-director Andrew Niccol (who wrote and directed "Gattaca" and wrote "The Truman Show") returns with another story of paranoid conspiracy, set in a near future in which "time is now the currency": The genetically engineered citizens stop aging at 25 and die a year later, unless they're rich enough to extend their potentially eternal young adulthoods. Prophetically arriving at about the same time as the Occupy Wall Street protests, the film couldn't be more relevant: It's very much a comment on the increasingly immoral wealth gap ("Darwinian capitalism," in the words of the time-rich elitist played by Vincent Kartheiser of "Mad Men.") Unfortunately, it's also ham-handed, especially when Niccol panders to the perceived interests of the mainstream audience with indifferently staged thriller-action sequences. Justin Timberlake stars as the "ghetto" resident who tries to expose this rigged system; Amanda Seyfried is the radicalized high-society refugee who becomes his helpmate and bedmate.

Bartlett 10.

The Iron Lady (PG-13, 105 min.) This isn't a great movie, but Meryl Streep is great in it: As Margaret Thatcher, the United Kingdom's first and only woman prime minister to date, Streep is convincing and astonishing and eminently watchable -- she's no parody or waxwork, not even when she's done up in convincing old-age makeup to portray the doddering Thatcher as a lonely and somewhat tragic figure, isolated by fame and dementia, and carrying on conversations with her dead husband (Jim Broadbent), whose nickname for his wife -- "MT" -- may be a pun representing the filmmakers' opinion of their heroine's heart. Directed by Phyllida Lloyd ("Mamma Mia!") and scripted by Abi Morgan ("Shame"), the movie, which jumps back and forth in time, lacks structure and a coherent political point of view; it touches on the arguably tragic human cost of Thatcher's conservative cost-cutting and "warmonger" policies, but more insistently presents "the Iron Lady" as a heroic sort of right-wing feminist, rising to power within a condescending male-dominated government, inspired by the belief that a woman's life "must matter, beyond all the cooking and the cleaning and the children."

Cordova Cinema, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Ridgeway Four.

Jack and Jill (PG, 91 min.) Not since Max Baer donned ringlets and petticoats to portray Jethrine Bodine on "The Beverly Hillbillies" has a drag act been as ghastly as the one perpetrated by Adam Sandler in this alternately tasteless and schmaltzy comedy about a privileged Hollywood adman (Sandler) who ultimately learns to love his obnoxious, awkward sister (also Sandler, wearing a long black wig, so he resembles a Bronx Cher worthy of a Bronx cheer).

Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic.

J. Edgar (R, 137 min.) Like the ultimately unknowable subject of this ambitious biopic, director Clint Eastwood has spent almost his entire adult life being regarded as an icon of law enforcement and often violent justice, and he understands the tension between private behavior and public image; it's this tension that apparently interested Eastwood in this difficult project about longtime FBI director J. Edgar Hoover.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Joyful Noise (PG-13, 118 min.) "Glee" meets God in director Todd Graff's lively gospel musical, set in a cheerful if economically depressed Georgia small town where Everywoman Queen Latifah and the surgically altered Dolly Parton (her new mouth is so distracting you won't even notice her chest) battle for control of the church choir. Produced by Fred Smith's Alcon Entertainment company in hopes of reaching the "faith" audience that made "The Blind Side" a hit, the film's Christian message is muffled somewhat by the faux gospel song selections, which include churchy renditions of Michael Jackson's "The Man in the Mirror" and Paul McCartney's "Maybe I'm Amazed," repurposed as a pro-Jesus song. Keke Palmer is Latifah's good-girl daughter; Broadway star Jeremy Jordan is the bad-boy prodigal son who shakes up the conservative gospel choir, demonstrating that "Sly Stone funk" is more likely to win a national gospel competition than traditional song fare (a sad if true moral). Even so, some of the musical numbers are knockouts, especially a show-stopping version of Billy Preston's "That's the Way God Planned It" belted out by the movie's great discovery, 14-year-old Lithonia, Ga., "children's choir" sensation Ivan Kelley Jr.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG-13, 133 min.) The first live-action film from director Brad Bird ("The Iron Giant," "Ratatouille") doesn't reach the giddy action heights of his incredible "The Incredibles," but it occasionally comes close, with a chase through a dust storm and an already famous sequence in which IMF agent Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise, increasingly cipher-like) attempts to scale the glassy exterior of the world's tallest manmade structure, the Burj Khalifa skyscraper in Dubai. Better still is the scene in which Hunt and his comic-relief associate (Simon Pegg) infiltrate the Kremlin with, essentially, a high-tech magic trick; the playfulness of the effect demonstrates the usefulness of Bird's background in the astonish-the-audience culture of animation. With Jeremy Renner and Paula Patton as the other members of Hunt's outcast team.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Moneyball (PG-13, 133 min.) Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill.

Bartlett 10.

My Week with Marilyn (R, 101 min.) Sort of like "Me and Orson Welles" but with a more curvaceous title celebrity, this impeccably produced and thoroughly entertaining backstage showbiz yarn examines a few days in the presence of greatness through the eyes of a starstruck young man, Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), who parlays a job as gofer on the tense set of Laurence Olivier's 1957 production "The Prince and the Showgirl" into a short-term one-sided love affair with "the most famous woman in the world," Marilyn Monroe. Michelle Williams brings depth and compassion to her performance as Hollywood's tragic blond bombshell, and her sincerity invests the entire film with a sort of grandeur.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

New Year's Eve (PG-13, 119 min.) In the tradition of "Valentine's Day," an all-star romantic-comedy romp from director Garry Marshall.

CinePlanet 16, Summer Quartet Drive-In, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Paranormal Activity 3 (R, 84 min.) A prequel to a prequel, this third and least persuasive film in the low-budget faux found-footage fright franchise confounds the continuity of previous entries and adds few new scares.

Bartlett 10.

Puss in Boots (PG, 90 min.)

Bartlett 10.

Real Steel (PG-13, 127 min.) Hugh Jackman, Dakota Goyo.

Bartlett 10.

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13, 129 min.) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Sitter (R, 82 min.) Smart-aleck college student Jonah Hill is unprepared for the challenges of babysitting.

Majestic.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R, 127 min.) Swedish director Tomas Alfredson's adaptation of John le Carré's 1974 best-seller -- famously adapted in 1979 by the BBC with Alec Guinness in the lead -- is as deceptive, withholding and cerebral as its anti-James Bond hero, veteran British secret service agent George Smiley, played here by a gray and unreadable Gary Oldman. The complex story finds Smiley trying to sniff out the Soviet "mole" in the service's ranks; suspect spies are represented by such fine character actors as Colin Firth, Toby Jones and Ciarán Hinds. Although the camerawork is stealthy and unshowy, the film is among the most visually striking and purposeful of recent years. The busy production design, which takes full advantage of the spacious horizontal emphasis of Alfredson's widescreen compositions, is a marvel of authentic 1970s period detail and meaningful geometry: Windows, bookshelves, soundproofed isolation chambers and other rectangular elements frequently partition the frame into grids, to suggest entrapment and to echo the story's chess motif.

Paradiso.

Tower Heist (PG-13, 104 min.) Ben Stiller, Eddie Murphy.

Bartlett 10.

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part 1 (PG-13, 118 min.) While certain political groups try to push through "Defense of Marriage" legislation and "personhood" amendments, moviegoers and readers vote by the millions in favor of a series that approves of marriage between human and nonhuman, and that suggests that a vampire or werewolf can be just as worthy of love as a conventional "person." Yet this first chapter of the conclusion of the "Twilight" series also conveys a paradoxical "pro-life" message, as virgin-no-more Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) insists on carrying to term the bloodsucking half-vampire baby in her belly, the result of her bed-shredding honeymoon with hooded-eyed Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson).

CinePlanet 16, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Summer Quartet Drive-In, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

War Horse (PG-13, 146 min.) Inspired and forced, cornball and true, Steven Spielberg's sweeping saga of the unbreakable bond between unworthy man and noble animal may not be a masterpiece, but it's a welcome rarity: a quality "family" film with appeal for audience members of all ages, and a movie that suggests that people of decency and integrity are not an endangered species. Adapted from the 1982 children's book by Michael Morpugo that also inspired the Tony Award-winning Broadway play, the movie ranges from the green shires of England to the blasted "no man's land" battlefields of World War I, as a "fancy horse" turned work horse turned cavalry steed named Joey copes with separation from his beloved Albert (Jeremy Irvine), a bright-eyed farmboy.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

We Bought a Zoo (PG, 124 min.) Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson take over a failing California menagerie.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Young Adult (R, 94 min.) Charlize Theron's Mavis Gary is no serial killer, but she's another memorable Theron "Monster": an alcoholic and seriously depressed 37-year-old "psychotic prom queen bitch" and teen-novel ghost writer who returns to the small-town Minnesota scene of her high-school triumphs to steal her now happily married ex-boyfriend (Patrick Wilson) from his special-needs teacher wife (Elizabeth Reaser) and infant daughter. A reunion of the "Juno" team of director Jason Reitman and writer Diablo Cody, the film is darkly entertaining but sour.

Studio on the Square.

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