Movie Capsules: What's showing

Street hoops in 'Doin' It in the Park.' Photo by Bobbito Garcia

Street hoops in 'Doin' It in the Park.' Photo by Bobbito Garcia

OPENING FRIDAY

Before Midnight (R, 108 min.) See review on Page 13.

Cordova Cinema, Ridgeway Four.

Man of Steel (PG-13, 143 min.) Wire review on Page 16.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

SPECIAL MOVIES

Doin’ It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC (Not rated, 83 min.) Presented by the Memphis Grizzlies, this documentary takes an in-depth look at New York’s thriving playground basketball culture.

1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. $8, or $6 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

From Memphis to Philadelphia (Not rated, 90 min.) Memphian George W. Tillman Jr. created this documentary about the experiences of the Memphis women who participated in the 1997 “Million Woman March,” a protest intended to promote black political power, economic development and sisterhood.

7 p.m. Wednesday, Studio on the Square. Tickets: $10.

Gimme the Loot (Not rated, 81 min.) A pair of Bronx graffiti writers plan to tag an iconic New York landmark in this acclaimed indie comedy-adventure.

7 p.m. Thursday, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. $8, or $6 for museum members. Visit brooksmuseum.org.

Gone with the Wind (G, 238 min.) The 1939 saga of the Civil War remains the biggest U.S. theatrical hit of all time: When its box-office take is adjusted for inflation, it’s earned $1.6 billion, compared to $1.4 billion for “Star Wars.” Indie Memphis executive director Erik Jambor will introduce the film.

7 p.m. Friday, the Orpheum, 203 S. Main. Admission: $7, or $5 for Indie Memphis members and kids 12 and under. Visit oprheum-memphis.com.

How to Train Your Dragon (PG, 98 min.) A young Viking (voiced by Jay Baruchel) befriends a flying dragon in this DreamWorks Animation hit.

8:15 p.m. Friday, Central Park, The Avenue Carriage Crossing, Collierville. Admission: free. Visit shopcarriagecrossing.com.

Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG, 91 min.) Sid the sloth and his prehistoric pals encounter sea monsters and a monkey pirate captain in this “Malco Kids Summer Film Fest” presentation, to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and other facilities.

10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Cordova Cinema, Collierville Towne 16, Stage Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16. Admisson: $2. Visit malco.com.

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (PG, 91 min.) The New York zoo refugees join a traveling circus as the CinePlanet 16’s summer series for kids continues.

10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, CinePlanet 16. Admisson: free. Visit mycinematimes.com.

The Philadelphia Story (Not rated, 112 min.) Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart star in a 1940 high-society romantic comedy classic.

7 p.m. Thursday, the Orpheum, 203 S. Main. Admission: $7, or $5 for Indie Memphis members and kids 12 and under. Visit oprheum-memphis.com.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R, 100 min.) The monthly screening of the ultimate audience-participation sci-fi rock ‘n roll musical cult classic.

11:30 p.m. Friday, Evergreen Theatre, 1705 Poplar. Tickets: $10. Visit rockyhorrormemphis.com.

The Sandlot (PG, 101 min.) Director David Mickey Evans hosts this 20th-anniversary ballpark screening of his coming-of-age family comedy about a gang of baseball-loving kids in suburban California in 1962.

Saturday, AutoZone Park. Gates: 6 p.m. Movie: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $7 in advance; $10 Saturday; $20 for a ‘Family Four Pack.’ Visit memphisredbirds.com.

Thelma & Louise (R, 130 min.) Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis become accidental outlaws in this 1991 feminist action-road movie, directed by Ridley (“Alien”) Scott. Part of the Outflix Summer Series.

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Studio on the Square. Tickets: $10. Visit mglcc.org.

Tiger Eyes (PG-13, 102 min.) A high-school girl (Willa Holland) moves from Atlantic City to Los Alamos, N.M., after the murder of her father in this new adaptation of a Judy Blume novel. These special screenings are in addition to the movie’s regular run at the Wolfchase.

2 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday, Memphis Jewish Community Center, 6560 Poplar. Tickets: $8, or $6 for students. Visit jccmemphis.org/tigereyes.

Titans of the Ice Age: Narrated by Christopher Plummer, this Imax feature film transports you to the otherworldly frozen landscapes of the Northern Hemisphere 10,000 years before modern civilization. Runs through June 21. Tickets: $8.25; $7.50 senior citizens, and $6.50 for ages 3-12.

Imax Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 901-636-2362 for showtimes, tickets and reservations.

To Fly! Documentary shows the history of flight, from 19th century balloons through 21st century space probes. Runs through June 21. Tickets $8.25,$7.50 for senior citizens, and $6.50 for ages 3-12.

Imax Theater at Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. Call 901-636-2362 for showtimes, tickets and reservations.

NOW SHOWING

After Earth (PG-13, 100 min.) HH Some parents post their children’s piano recitals, school plays and sports accomplishments on YouTube. If you’re Will and Jada Pinkett Smith, however, you have access to a more impressive media platform: You can produce a movie for your kid. Directed by humbled auteur-turned-hired hand M. Night Shyamalan, this science-fiction adventure is not another of Will Smith’s star vehicles but a showcase for 14-year-old son Jaden Smith, who treks across a monster-stalked, forest-primeval future Earth while his famous space ranger dad, immobilized by a broken leg, spends the movie in a wrecked spaceship, barking orders and keeping a watchful eye on his offspring via 31st-century Skype. The result is a survival story that’s more Dr. Laura or even L. Ron Hubbard than Jack London. “Fear is not real,” dad lectures son. “Fear is a choice.” As the story of a son desperate to please a perfectionist celebrity father, the movie may be more worthwhile for future Smith family biographers than for action fans; Will generously cedes top billing to Jaden, but the film is more credible as a portrait of father-son rivalry than as an uplifting bonding adventure. The photography and effects impress but the action is sporadic, and the science illogical: Humankind abandoned the polluted Earth centures earlier, yet every animal left behind “has evolved to kill humans”?

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

The Croods (PG, 98 min.) HH½ The humor’s classic or prehistoric, depending on your tolerance for slapstick. The 3D animation is state of the art. And the life lessons are all too wearily contemporary in this energetic DreamWorks digital cartoon feature about some cave dwellers who are so Stone Age they make the Flintstones look like the Jetsons.

Palace Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Epic (PG, 103 min.) A teenage girl discovers a hidden world of tiny warriors and talking slugs when she is shrunk to bug-size.

CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Collierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Majestic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso (in 3-D), Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Escape from Planet Earth (PG, 95 min.) Alien astronaut Scotch Supernova (voiced by Brendan Fraser) lands on a notoriously dangerous planet in this computer-animated film from the producers of “Hoodwinked!”

Bartlett 10.

Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13, 130 min.) HH Vin Diesel and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson are so pumped up, so anatomically inflated and unlikely that when they have a confrontation in this fifth follow-up to “The Fast & the Furious” (2001), it’s like watching a pair of unmoored Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons bump against each other. Giant vulcanized renditions of Underdog and Charlie Brown probably have more interesting conversations, however; lines spoken here include “I got this,” “Talk to me” and “You don’t turn your back on family.” The latter has become the trite theme of this unsafe-at-any-speed franchise, which has increased its international box-office appeal even as director Justin Lin (behind the wheel here for his fourth “Fast” film) has upped the vehicular mayhem. Part 6 adds real-life martial artist Gina Carano to the already overcrowded ensemble of bodybuilders, rappers and supermodels but otherwise is a lesser effort than its Rio-based predecessor, primarily because its two gigantic and protracted set pieces — one involving a tank on a bridge, the other the pursuit of a cargo plane — become too ridiculous to be believed. You might call it a bridge (with tank) too far.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

42 (PG-13, 128 min.) Chadwick Boseman is Jackie Robinson in this biopic about the Hall of Famer who broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball.

Bartlett 10, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Frances Ha (R, 86 min.) HHHH As a love letter from director (Noah Baumbach) to star (Greta Gerwig), this delightful, clever, funny, poignant and wise film surpasses even its most obvious inspiration, Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall.” Other sources include Allen’s “Manhattan” (the New York-based “Frances Ha,” too, is in black-and-white) and the romantic classics of the French New Wave (the movie borrows much of its music from composers who worked for Truffaut, Resnais and Godard). Yet for all its thrifty appropriations, it’s as fresh and contemporary as an episode of “Girls” -- an inevitable comparison, thanks in part to the presence of actor Adam Driver -- or the microbudgeted independent films that brought Gerwig to her current level of semi-stardom. The movie finds the lovely, gawky, barely employed and “undateable” Frances (Gerwig) at the precise moment when life, to use a general term, has decreed she must becomes a “grown-up,” due to the decamping of her longtime best friend and roommate (Mickey Sumner); “I’m not a real person yet,” Frances protests/confesses, with a mix of embarrassment and pride. “I can’t account for my own bruises,” she adds, as if she were a clumsy kid with an adult’s vocabulary; does the remark refer to more than the abrasions on her skin? The ending may be pat, but who in the audience will begrudge Frances her small triumph and her opportunity for romance? She deserves happiness. Don’t we all?

Ridgeway Four.

G.I. Joe: Retaliation (PG-13, 110 min.) HH This disappointing sequel pits the Joes against an impostor U.S. president (Jonathan Pryce) working for the evil forces of Cobra. I

Bartlett 10.

The Great Gatsby (PG-13, 142 min.) HH½ Attracted to the self-made glamour of both Jay-G (Jay Gatsby) and Jay-Z (the rapper), Baz Luhrmann imagines F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age masterpiece as an homage to a culture’s envy, embrace and forgiveness of conspicuous consumption; the director has a vision, all right, but it’s a cheesy one, and it falters once it moves beyond costume and décor. In a nod to “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” Everyman neighbor Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) narrates from a psychiatrist’s office, as if to justify the impossible, expressionistic set pieces that follow: hysterical parties — more Tony Scott than Busby Berkeley, more post-”Moulin Rouge” than pre-code Hollywood — where Gershwin bumps against Shawn Carter on the soundtrack; and crazed road races through Long Island and Manhattan, where the greenscreen landscapes are so digitally unreal even the eyes of T.J. Eckleburg need 3D glasses. Not until a tense hotel scene that emphasizes acting and Fitzgerald’s dialogue over Luhrmann’s spastic creativity do we begin to believe in the love story between the mysterious neo-millionaire Gatsby (a wonderful Leonardo DiCaprio) and the fey Daisy (Carey Mulligan, defeated by a hopeless role), which nevertheless lacks the tenderness of the relationship between Gatsby and Nick. So we beat on, stereoscopic boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past, listening to Amy Winehouse, and admiring the supporting performances of Joel Edgerton as Tom Buchanan and Elizabeth Debicki as Jordan Baker.

Collierville Towne 16, Ridgeway Four, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

The Hangover Part III (R, 100 min.) H½ Human pain and humiliation may be the essence of comedy, but animal cruelty — outside the context of a “Tom and Jerry” cartoon — is hardly funny. Director Todd Phillips’ third film about the so-called Wolfpack touts its giraffe decapitation in its trailer; the movie also includes the smothering of a chicken with a pillow and the poisoning of dogs. If you complain, you will be told to “lighten up” or that “it’s just a joke”; these are the fallback responses employed by the despicable to defend racist and sexist humor, too. The first “Hangover” was troubling yet funny and ingenious; the retread sequel was xenophobic; “Part III” is merely pointless, as the insufferable Phil (Bradley Cooper), the spineless Stu (Ed Helms) and the pathetic Alan (Zach Galifianakis, squandering a unique and once-promising comic creation) are overshadowed by the reckless and wacky gangster Mr. Chow (Ken Jeong) in a return trip to Las Vegas.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

The Iceman (R, 106 min.) Michael Shannon continues his reign as the scariest man in movies. This time, he’s a contract killer.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Identity Thief (R, 111 min.) HH In supporting roles in “Bridesmaids” and other comedies, Melissa McCarthy has been a ruthless and unapologetic scene-stealer, so it’s appropriate that her first feature-film star vehicle casts her as is a professional pilferer, pursued by drug dealers, a skip tracer (Robert Patrick) and the insecure Everyman (Jason Bateman) she befriends during a zany cross-country road trip.

Bartlett 10.

The Internship (PG-13, 119 min.) Relative old-timers Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson seek jobs on the Google campus.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Iron Man 3 (PG-13, 130 min.) HHH Terrorist and anxiety attacks prove equally dismaying to Marvel’s superheroic “man in a can” in this witty, satisfying sequel.

Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso, Stage Cinema.

Jurassic Park 3D (PG-13, 127 min.) HHHH The family impulse that motivates so many Steven Spielberg stories is revealed to be an evolutionary imperative in this thrilling, near-perfect 1993 action-adventure; the dinosaur special effects, which combined new digital technology with then state-of-the-art live-action techniques, were groundbreaking yet remain unsurpassed. .

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Mud (PG-13, 130 min.) HHH With references to Mark Twain, “Robinson Crusoe” and even “The Andy Griffith Show,” the third and most elaborate feature to date from Arkansas writer-director Jeff Nichols has the feel of a classic, although it’s perhaps not enthralling enough to be one. Ellis (Tye Sheridan), an emotionally vulnerable 14-year-old, befriends a gun-toting fugitive who calls himself Mud (Matthew McConaughey) — a surrogate father figure with cross-shaped nails in his boots (“to ward off evil spirits”) and a romantic back story about a lifelong true love (Reese Witherspoon). Somewhat overwritten and overmotivated, “Muds” is nevertheless very welcome: It’s no Southern Gothic pastiche but a convincing portrait of a South rarely seen on-screen — the South of Walmarts and water moccasins, of mussel divers and motor bikes, of hick accents and punk rock. “This way of life isn’t long for this world,” Ellis’ father (Ray McKinnon) tells his son. What way of life is? The soundtrack includes band and solo work by Nichols’ brother, Ben Nichols, frontman of the Memphis rock group Lucero.

Collierville Towne 16, Ridgeway Four.

Now You See Me (PG-13, 116 min.) HH½ Celebrity magicians Jesse Eisenberg, Isla Fisher, Woody Harrelson and Dave Franco pull off various “impossible” heists and capers while being dogged by detective Mark Ruffalo, Interpol agent Mélanie Laurent and magic debunker Morgan Freeman in this slick, sparkly thriller/puzzler from director Louis Leterrier (“The Transporter”). The movie initially dazzles but ultimately succumbs to the Houdiniesque straitjacket of its implausibility; it’s fun, but like too many post-”Unusual Suspects” mysteries, it tries so hard to be clever it becomes silly.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso.

Oblivion (PG-13, 126 min.) HHH It’s 2077, and Tom Cruise is apparently the last man on Earth.

Bartlett 10, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Olympus Has Fallen (R, 117 min.) HH½ America is emasculated when terrorists knock the tip off the Washington Monument during an attack on the nation’s capital; lucky for us, he-man Gerard Butler, cast as a Secret Service agent in need of redemption, is nearby to inject testosterone into the body politic and some knives into the bad guys’ necks.

Bartlett 10.

Oz the Great and Powerful (PG, 131 min.) HH½ James Franco is the wizard.

Bartlett 10.

Peeples (PG-13, 95 min.) HH½ The debut feature from writer-director Tina Gordon Chism is sitcom, with subtext — a sort of black-cast reworking of “Meet the Parents,” but with a modest budget, a less aggressive tone and a generosity of spirit — an embrace of diversity within the African-American community — that distinguishes it from the typically hectoring productions that emerge from Tyler Perry’s 34th Street Films company. Elevated from second banana status, bulky, deadpan Craig Robinson stars as Wade Walker, a struggling New York children’s performer who crashes a family reunion at the Sag Harbor summer home of his beautiful, successful girlfriend (Kerry Washington); the girl’s mother (S. Epatha Merkerson) embraces him, but he’s met with suspicion by pompous, formal Judge Peeples (David Alan Grier).

Bartlett 10, Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

The Purge (R, 85 min.) HHH A state-of-the-art security system and an exclusive gated address provide insufficient protection when an all-American family (led by father Ethan Hawke and mother Lena Headey) is besieged by psycho thugs in this effective horror-thriller, which contrary to the home-invasion emphasis of its trailer never loses touch with its ingenious premise: Set in the year 2022, the movie imagines a “reborn” United States that lets its citizens blow off steam during an annual 12-hour period known as “The Purge” (“an outlet for American rage”), in which all crime is legalized. Unlike Shirley Jackson, whose classic short story “The Lottery” was an obvious inspiration, writer-director James DeMonaco overemphasizes his violent shocker’s political content (“Things like this are not supposed to happen in our neighborhood!” a character laments), but this low-budget grindhouse “Hunger Games” is admirable for its slyness as well as its scares.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Scary Movie 5 (PG-13, 85 min.) The now-Anna Faris-free horror-spoof franchise rises from the grave after a seven-year hibernation.

Bartlett 10.

Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13, 132 min.) HHH½ Director-fanboy J.J. Abrams’ follow-up to his franchise-reviving 2009 “Star Trek” is a super-glossy spectacle of bludgeoning action and emotion — moment to moment, it’s as entertaining, rousing and visually impressive as any recent science-fiction action epic, as reckless young Captain Kirk (Chris Pine), the Vulcan Mr. Spock (Zachary Quinto) and their colorful subordinates battle a genetic superman (mesmerizingly mannered Benedict Cumberbatch) who is pursuing a deadly vendetta against a warmongering Starfleet admiral (Peter Weller). CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hollywood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square.

This Is the End (R, 107 min.) Opened Wednesday. See review on Page 12.

CinePlanet 16, Collierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Forest Hill 8, Hollywood 20 Cinema, Majestic, Palace Cinema, Paradiso, Stage Cinema, Studio on the Square, Summer Quartet Drive-In.

Tiger Eyes (PG-13, 102 min.) HH½ Reading Judy Blume novels has been a rite of passage for girls for decades, yet this is the first of the best-selling, sometimes controversial Young Adult author’s books to be adapted into a theatrical feature film. Perhaps Blume wanted to keep it all in the family: The director is her son, Lawrence Blume. Willa Holland stars as a grieving high-school girl abruptly relocated from ramshackle Atlantic City to Los Alamos, where the culture shock is more than geographical: Her New Mexico aunt and uncle are well-to-do, uptight, corny and strict. Respectful of its source, the film is quite moving, thanks to Blume’s storytelling and the sincerity of the performances, but it’s directed without distinction; it’s more notable for its status as the first Judy Blume movie than for its rather lowkey accomplishment.

Wolfchase Galleria Cinema 8.

Tyler Perry’s Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor (PG-13, 111 min.) Now, that’s a movie title.

Bartlett 10.

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